2 retweets More on ‘rohingya blog news 24 huars

@GunturRomli GunturRomli : @gm_gm : Silakan baca laporan ttg Penderitaan Muslim Rohingya – Al Jazeera Blogs: http://t.co/BgPrOHxL Sun Jul 22 21:35:37 UTC+0000 2012

Scant compassion for Muslim Rohingya refugees – Al Jazeera Blogs

blogs.aljazeera.com

@gm_gm gm_gm : Silakan baca laporan ttg Penderitaan Muslim Rohingya – Al Jazeera Blogs: http://t.co/ZB2HFRnq Sun Jul 22 17:14:38 UTC+0000 2012

@AJEnglish AJEnglish : On the Blog: Scant compassion for Muslim Rohingya refugees http://t.co/TvbjdF1m Sun Jul 22 17:11:12 UTC+0000 2012

@MotherJones MotherJones : In “Exiled to Nowhere,” a photojournalist pulls us into the harsh limbo inhabited by Burma’s Rohingya refugees. http://t.co/Axfh7WZM Sun Jul 22 00:00:19 UTC+0000 2012

Between Burma and a Hard Place | Mother Jones

In “Exiled to Nowhere,” a photojournalist pulls us into the harsh limbo inhabited by Burma’s Rohingya refugees. …

www.motherjones.com

@MotherJones MotherJones : In “Exiled to Nowhere,” a photojournalist pulls us into the harsh limbo inhabited by Burma’s Rohingya refugees. http://t.co/Axfh7WZM Sat Jul 21 06:15:02 UTC+0000 2012

@MotherJones MotherJones : In “Exiled to Nowhere,” a photojournalist pulls us into the harsh limbo inhabited by Burma’s Rohingya refugees. http://t.co/Axfh7WZM Wed Jul 18 17:50:03 UTC+0000 2012

@MotherJones MotherJones : In “Exiled to Nowhere,” a photojournalist pulls us into the harsh limbo inhabited by Burma’s Rohingya refugees. http://t.co/Axfh7WZM Wed Jul 18 14:16:00 UTC+0000 2012

@amjadt25 amjadt25 : غاردين البريطانية تصف ما يحصل في اقليم اراكان في بورما “تطهير عرقي للمسلمين”و انتهاك لحقوق البشر http://t.co/Qnyqaw8I #Arakan @Malarab1 Wed Jul 04 23:52:19 UTC+0000 2012

Burma’s Rohingya refugees find little respite in Bangladesh | Global development | guardian.co.uk

Sectarian violence in Burma has sent Muslim Rohingya refugees fleeing across the border, but they find themselves unwelcome in neighbouring Bangladesh …

www.guardian.co.uk

@amjadt25 amjadt25 : Guardian:The #Mogh slaughtered my brothers.They will kill us all …please help us. http://t.co/Qnyqaw8I #Burma #Rohingya #refugees #Arakan Wed Jul 04 23:46:29 UTC+0000 2012

@akrockefeller akrockefeller : Where now for #Burma ‘s #Rohingya ? http://t.co/UQfmcnwL #RememberRohingya Sat Jun 30 02:16:02 UTC+0000 2012

Where now for Burma’s Rohingya? || AK Rockefeller

Channel 4 News Asia Correspondent John Sparks reports on the Rohingya refugees being pushed back from Bangladesh after fleeing persecution in Burma. …

akrockefeller.com

@GdnDevelopment GdnDevelopment : Burma’s Rohingya refugees find little respite in Bangladesh http://t.co/U7VZIih8 via @guardian #globaldev Fri Jun 29 11:39:45 UTC+0000 2012

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Between Burma and a Hard Place

—By

| Wed Jul. 18, 2012 3:00 AM PDT

(Nowhere People, 2012)(Nowhere People, 2012)Though ostensibly a photo book, Exiled to Nowhere serves as a vivid collection of reportage that few magazines could (or, these days, would) deliver. Photojournalist Greg Constantine takes us to the Burma-Bangladesh border, where tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees live in crowded, dirty camps. A minority long prosecuted by the Burmese government, the Rohingya live in a state of perpetual fear and uncertainty. Their pervasive sense of living essentially “nowhere” is what Constantine successfully captures in his latest book.

Whereas Saiful Huq Omi’s powerful photographic work for the Magnum Foundation traces the wider diaspora of the Rohingya living in England, Malaysia, and Bangladesh, Constantine’s book focuses primarily on the tense border region inhabited by tens of thousands of Rohingya.

Shot in stark black and white, Constantine’s photos subvert any romantic notions of what it’s like to be a working documentary photographer, instead evoking the patience and commitment required. Constantine shot the series over the course of eight different trips, between 2006 and 2012.

Detained RohingyaA group of Rohingya men are detained at a highway checkpoint in southern Bangladesh.
The 92 photos in the book detail life in various refugee camps, showing the monotony and struggles of daily life. They give a sense of who these people are: In the different camps, among the different families, a repetition of a muddy, difficult, yet somehow self-sure existence emerges.

Kutupalong Makeshift Camp Greg ConstantineOver the last 20 years, legions of Rohingya have fled their homeland and now live as unrecognized refugees in neighboring Bangladesh. Some 20,000 live in the squalid environs known as Kutupalong Makeshift camp.
The book’s accompanying interviews and text provide important context: Reading about how Thai authorities pushed boats full of Bangladeshi and Rohingya refugees out to sea—many of them to their deaths—or about how others were threatened and viciously beaten in Burma, adds that much more impact to the photos.

Tal Makeshift Camp A woman and her grandchild sit on the side of the road at the Tal Makeshift Camp near the town of Teknaf. Most Rohingya in southern Bangladesh are not recognized as refugees and receive little or no humanitarian assistance.
The bar is high when it comes to grabbing the attention of readers (and photo editors) with projects focused on human rights in desolate places. It’s refreshing to get yanked out of that jaded place by a successful project like Constantine’s.
A group of Rohingya men push their fishing boat back onto shore. 
Most Rohingya men in the Shamlapur area of Bangladesh work as bonded 
laborers and are trapped into debt to local Bangladeshi boat owners.A group of Rohingya men push their fishing boat back onto shore. Most Rohingya men in the Shamlapur region of Bangladesh work as bonded laborers and are trapped in debt to local Bangladeshi boat owners.
Exiled to Nowhere
is the second book in a longer term project called Nowhere People, a documentation of stateless people around the world in places including Sri Lanka, Nepal, Malaysia, Ukraine, and Bangladesh. (Constantine’s first book, Kenya’s Nubians: Then & Now, was published in November 2011.) It’s an ambitious undertaking, and perhaps one that only a thoroughly committed photographer like Constantine could pull off.

Scant compassion for Muslim Rohingya refugees

Source from ; http://blogs.aljazeera.com/blog/asia/scant-compassion-muslim-rohingya-refugees

Scant compassion for Muslim Rohingya refugees

Nicolas Haque is an Al Jazeera correspondent working out of Dhaka, Bangladesh.

July 22, 2012 – 17:51

Entering the Rohingya camps along the Bangladesh-Myanmar border is restricted.

Officially they don’t even exist, but in reality authorities tolerate their presence. Bangladeshi official say there are about 300,000 unregistered Muslim Rohingya refugees from Myanmar living in dismal and squalid conditions with no electricity or drinking water and restricted from access to hospitals or schools. Leaving the camps is prohibited, but many find a way out anyway.

Visitors are not welcome, especially ones with cameras. Police informants are placed inside and out to keep an eye on unauthorised visitors. We managed to sneak in during a sudden spell of heavy monsoon downpour. The rains were a blessing; the police informants ran for cover and we walked unnoticed into the camp. As we climbed up the narrow muddy lanes, an eerie silence hung thick in the air. Behind each improvised tent we passed, we could see the eyes of men, women and children peering out. They were all quiet, as if in hiding. Some were shaking. They were scared.

Last month, sectarian violence between the Rohingya Muslim minority and the Buddhist majority left about 80 dead and many more injured in Myanmar’s Rakhine state bordering Bangladesh. The violence was taken as a sign of more to come; thousands tried to flee across the border into Bangladesh and they continue to do so.

Authorities in Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka do not see these fleeing Rohingyas as refugees but as illegal asylum seekers, and the country’s border guards are under strict order to send them back to where they came from. Still, many make it across.

Huddled in a dark makeshift tent made of mud and plastic sheets, I tried to speak to a group of them. It took time to build trust, to get the conversation going. Their silence speaks much louder than words. Some wept. A 14-year-old girl broke the silence.

She said one word.

“Rape”.

The others followed suit. They told us the Myanmar army and police go house to house, abducting men and sexually abusing women. One of the elders described what was happening in his homeland as state sponsored sectarian violence. And it is escalating, he said.

For decades, Muslim Rohingyas have suffered extreme discrimination. Their dark skin and religious difference are a source of deep prejudice amongst Myanmar’s Buddhist majority.  They are prohibited from owning land, running businesses, practicing their religion or getting married.

Myanmar’s move towards democracy last year instilled many Rohingya with a new sense of hope. Most are supporters of Aung San Suu Kyi, but she has remained uncomfortably quiet on their plight.

Roughly 29,000 Rohingya are recognised as refugees by the Bangladeshi government and UNHCR. In the eyes of the Bangladesh authorities the 300,000 others don’t exist, so they do not receive any UN aid.  A handful of aid agencies work with them, but none of them want to be filmed or named.

They say if we film these camps, the Bangladeshi authorities could shut their aid programmes down. Authorities have already refused $33m in UN aid money for the Rohingya and local Bangladeshi community in the area, saying that this would make life too comfortable and may risk attracting more refugees to Bangladesh.

As the downpour turned to a drizzle we made our way out of the camp before the informants showed up. The monsoon weather kept us safe, before it stopped we had to move. As we hurried out, a group of Rohingyas hurried in, like us, using the rain as the only source of cover.

Rohingyas: Myanmar’s exiles

Source from : http://www.hindustantimes.com/photos-news/Photos-India/rohingyas/Article4.aspx

Rohingyas: Myanmar’s exiles

14-May

A family, who says they belong to the Burmese Rohingya community from Myanmar, sit at a makeshift shelter in a camp in New Delhi May 14, 2012. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
A family, who says they belong to the Burmese Rohingya community 
from Myanmar, sit at a makeshift shelter in a camp in New Delhi May 14, 
2012. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi Rohingyas: Myanmar
People, who say they belong to the Burmese Rohingya community from
 Myanmar, sit in an open air madrasa, or a religious school, at a camp 
in New Delhi. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi Rohingyas: Myanmar
A family, who said they belonged to the Burmese Rohingya community
 from Myanmar, sit inside a mosquito net at a makeshift shelter at a 
camp in New Delhi. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi Rohingyas: Myanmar
Myanmar refugees from the Rohingya community, a predominantly 
Muslim sect in Myanmar, at a makeshift camp in New Delhi. AFP/Manan 
Vatsyayana Rohingyas: Myanmar
Myanmar refugees from the Rohingya community, a predominantly 
Muslim sect in Myanmar, sit at a makeshift camp in New Delhi. Over 2,000
 refugees from Myanmar have set up a temporary camp in south Delhi near a
 protected monument. The UNHCR has issued them asylum seeker cards but 
they have been demanding refugee status.  AFP/Manan Vatsyayana 
Rohingyas: Myanmar
A child, whose parents say they belong to the Burmese Rohingya 
community from Myanmar, sits inside a makeshift shelter in a camp in New
 Delhi. Around 2,500 refugees from Myanmar have put up camps on a land 
near New Delhi
Myanmar refugees from the Rohingya community, a predominantly 
Muslim sect in Myanmar, wait for medical care at a makeshift refugee 
camp in New Delhi. AFP PHOTO/ Andrew Caballero-Reynolds Rohingyas: 
Myanmar
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Rohingyas: Myanmar’s exiles 14-May

Myanmar refugees from the Rohingya community, a predominantly Muslim sect in Myanmar, wait for medical care at a makeshift refugee camp in New Delhi. AFP PHOTO/ Andrew Caballero-Reynolds
A family, who says they belong to the Burmese Rohingya community 
from Myanmar, sit at a makeshift shelter in a camp in New Delhi May 14, 
2012. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi Rohingyas: Myanmar
People, who say they belong to the Burmese Rohingya community from
 Myanmar, sit in an open air madrasa, or a religious school, at a camp 
in New Delhi. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi Rohingyas: Myanmar
A family, who said they belonged to the Burmese Rohingya community
 from Myanmar, sit inside a mosquito net at a makeshift shelter at a 
camp in New Delhi. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi Rohingyas: Myanmar
Myanmar refugees from the Rohingya community, a predominantly 
Muslim sect in Myanmar, at a makeshift camp in New Delhi. AFP/Manan 
Vatsyayana Rohingyas: Myanmar
Myanmar refugees from the Rohingya community, a predominantly 
Muslim sect in Myanmar, sit at a makeshift camp in New Delhi. Over 2,000
 refugees from Myanmar have set up a temporary camp in south Delhi near a
 protected monument. The UNHCR has issued them asylum seeker cards but 
they have been demanding refugee status.  AFP/Manan Vatsyayana 
Rohingyas: Myanmar
A child, whose parents say they belong to the Burmese Rohingya 
community from Myanmar, sits inside a makeshift shelter in a camp in New
 Delhi. Around 2,500 refugees from Myanmar have put up camps on a land 
near New Delhi
Myanmar refugees from the Rohingya community, a predominantly 
Muslim sect in Myanmar, wait for medical care at a makeshift refugee 
camp in New Delhi. AFP PHOTO/ Andrew Caballero-Reynolds Rohingyas: 
Myanmar
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Amnesty Int’l: Myanmar’s Rohingyas being targeted

 

Source from : http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/feedarticle/10345185

Amnesty Int’l: Myanmar’s Rohingyas being targeted

 

  • AP foreign, Friday July 20 2012

TODD PITMAN

Associated Press= BANGKOK (AP) — Communal violence is continuing in western Myanmar six weeks after the government declared a state of emergency there, and much of it is being directed at minority Muslim Rohingyas who have been beaten, killed and raped, Amnesty International said Friday.

The rights group accused both security forces and ethnic Rakhine Buddhists living in the region of carrying out fresh attacks against Rohingyas, who are seen as foreigners by the ethnic majority and denied citizenship by the government because it considers them illegal settlers from neighboring Bangladesh.

After a series of isolated killings starting in late May that left victims on both sides, bloody skirmishes quickly spread across much of Myanmar’s coastal Rakhine state. The government declared a state of emergency June 10, deploying troops to quell the unrest and protect both mosques and monasteries. The worst of the violence subsided two weeks later, and authorities said at least 78 people were killed and thousands of homes were burned down or destroyed — with damages roughly split evenly between Buddhists and Muslims.

Since then, communal violence has ground on, albeit at reduced intensity. But now, Amnesty said, attacks are mostly being directed at the Rohingya population.

Violence in the last six weeks has been “primarily one-sided, with Muslims generally and Rohingyas specifically the targets and victims,” Benjamin Zawacki, a Bangkok-based researcher for Amnesty, told The Associated Press. “Some of this is by the security forces’ own hands, some by Rakhine Buddhists with the security forces turning a blind eye in some cases.”

Officials from Myanmar’s government could not immediately be reached for comment.

Amnesty also said that security forces, including the police and the army, have conducted massive sweeps and detained hundreds of Rohingyas who are being held “incommunicado.”

“While the restoration of order, security, and the protection of human rights is necessary, most arrests appear to have been arbitrary and discriminatory, violating the rights to liberty and to freedom from discrimination on grounds of religion,” Amnesty said in a statement.

The violence, which reached its bloodiest point in June, constituted some of the country’s deadliest sectarian bloodshed in years and raised international concerns about the Rohingyas fate inside Myanmar.

President Thein Sein said earlier this month that the solution to ethnic enmity in Rakhine state was to either send the Rohingya to a third country or have the United Nations refugee agency look after them. UNHCR chief Antonio Guterres said, however, that it was not his agency’s job to resettle the Rohingya.

Many people in Myanmar don’t recognize Rohingya as legitimate settlers — even those of Bengali heritage who came in the 19th century, when Myanmar was under British rule and called Burma. Large exoduses of Rohingya to Bangladesh in the 1980s and 1990s because of persecution, and their subsequent return, also add to the confusion over who among them are illegal immigrants.

Bangladesh, for its part, also denies the Rohingya citizenship, arguing that they have been living in Myanmar for centuries and should be recognized as citizens there instead.

The U.N. estimates that 800,000 Rohingya live in Myanmar today. Thousands attempt to flee every year to Bangladesh, Malaysia and elsewhere in the region, trying to escape a life of abuse that rights groups say includes forced labor, violence against women and restrictions on movement, marriage and reproduction that breed anger and resentment.

Amnesty called on Myanmar to accept the Rohingya as citizens, something the government has staunchly opposed because it does not consider them an ethnic group native to Myanmar.

“Under international human rights law and standards, no one may be left or rendered stateless,” Zawacki said. “For too long Myanmar’s human rights record has been marred by the continued denial of citizenship for Rohingyas and a host of discriminatory practices against them.”

Amnesty Int’l: Myanmar’s Rohingyas being targeted

U.S. Ambassador to Myanmar Derek Mitchell talks to journalists during his first press conference after he became the ambassador at the U.S. Embassy in Yangon, Myanmar, Friday, July 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

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Source from : http://www.buffalonews.com/wire-feeds/24-hour-world-news/article956753.ece

Amnesty Int’l: Myanmar’s Rohingyas being targeted

By Todd PitmanASSOCIATED PRESS

Published:July 20, 2012, 8:46 PM

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Updated: July 20, 2012, 8:52 PM

// // BANGKOK (AP) – Communal violence is grinding on in western Myanmar six weeks after the government declared a state of emergency there, and Muslim Rohingyas are increasingly being hit with targeted attacks that have included killings, rape and physical abuse, Amnesty International said.A government spokesman for coastal Rakhine state, which was engulfed by a wave of bloody unrest in June, called the allegations made Friday groundless and biased. Amnesty’s claims are “totally opposite of what is happening on the ground,” spokesman Win Myaing said, adding that the region was calm.

Also Friday, the new U.S. ambassador to Myanmar announced a donation of $3 million in food aid to northern areas of the country affected by fighting between government troops and ethnic militias.

Amnesty International accused both security forces and ethnic Rakhine Buddhists of carrying out new attacks against Rohingyas, who are seen as foreigners by the ethnic majority and denied citizenship by the government because it considers them illegal settlers from neighboring Bangladesh.

After a series of isolated killings starting in late May that left victims on both sides, bloody skirmishes quickly spread across much of Myanmar’s coastal Rakhine state. The government declared a state of emergency June 10, deploying troops to quell the unrest and protect both mosques and monasteries. Authorities said at least 78 people were killed and thousands of homes were burned down or destroyed – with the damage roughly split evenly between Buddhists and Muslims.

The worst of the violence subsided late last month, but communal violence has ground on. Now, Amnesty said, it is being directed mostly at the Rohingya population.

Attacks over the last six weeks have been “primarily one-sided, with Muslims generally and Rohingyas specifically the targets and victims,” Benjamin Zawacki, a Bangkok-based researcher for Amnesty, told The Associated Press. “Some of this is by the security forces’ own hands, some by Rakhine Buddhists with the security forces turning a blind eye in some cases.”

The group also said security forces, including the police and the army, had conducted massive sweeps and detained hundreds of Rohingyas who are being held “incommunicado.”

“While the restoration of order, security, and the protection of human rights is necessary, most arrests appear to have been arbitrary and discriminatory, violating the rights to liberty and to freedom from discrimination on grounds of religion,” Amnesty said in a statement.

Win Myaing, the government spokesman, said security forces had arrested at least 100 Muslims in the northern Rakhine state town of Maungdaw, but he said the arrests were not discriminatory. Muslims account for more than 95 percent of the population in the town, he said, and it is natural they would comprise most of the arrests there.

Iran urged the United Nations to take action to protect the Rohingyas.

“We believe that ethnic and religious cleansing against Muslims under whatever pretext is unjustifiable and inexcusable under international law, and the United Nations must take urgent measures” to protect the Rohingyas by calling on Myanmar’s government to end its “crackdown,” Iran’s U.N. ambassador, Mohammad Khazaee, said in a letter Friday to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Myanmar has long faced tension with many of its ethnic minorities, who usually live in border regions. Although the new government has concluded cease-fires with many, there are still unresolved issues, and armed combat continues between the government and the Kachin minority in the north.

Ambassador Derek Mitchell announced at the U.S. Embassy Friday that the $3 million food aid donation for displaced people in Shan and Kachin states in northern Myanmar would be delivered through the U.N. World Food Program.

It was Mitchell’s first press briefing since he took his post earlier this month as the first U.S ambassador to Myanmar in two decades. Washington restored full diplomatic relations with Myanmar and eased sanctions in response to reforms initiated after the long-ruling military ceded power last year.

The U.S. already had announced earlier this month another $3 million aid package for humanitarian needs in Rakhine and Kachin states and disaster risk reduction.

The violence in Rakhine constituted some of the country’s deadliest sectarian bloodshed in years and raised international concerns about the Rohingyas’ fate inside Myanmar.

Many people in Myanmar don’t recognize Rohingya as legitimate settlers, though those of Bengali heritage who came in the 19th century, when Myanmar was under British rule and called Burma, are regarded as full citizens. Those who entered after Myanmar became independent in 1948 are considered illegal immigrants.

Bangladesh, for its part, also denies the Rohingya citizenship, arguing that they have been living in Myanmar for centuries and should be recognized as citizens there instead.

The U.N. estimates that 800,000 Rohingya live in Myanmar today. Thousands attempt to flee every year to Bangladesh, Malaysia and elsewhere in the region to escape a life of abuse that rights groups say includes forced labor, violence against women and restrictions on movement, marriage and reproduction.

Amnesty called on Myanmar to accept the Rohingya as citizens.

“Under international human rights law and standards, no one may be left or rendered stateless,” Zawacki said. “For too long Myanmar’s human rights record has been marred by the continued denial of citizenship for Rohingyas and a host of discriminatory practices against them.”

___

Associated Press writer Aye Aye Win contributed to this report from Yangon, Myanmar.

A friend’s appeal to Burma

A friend’s appeal to Burma

Tuesday, 19 June 2012 13:33 Benedict Rogers
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source from ; http://mizzima.com/edop/commentary/7349-a-friends-appeal-to-burma.html

(Commentary) – The violence in Arakan State over the past two weeks has caused disillusion for some, division among many, and shock and anguish for everyone. Racial and religious tensions that have simmered just beneath the surface for years have exploded into an ugly cycle of destruction and revenge which threatens to derail Burma’s journey towards democracy and peace.

Benedict Rogers  Photo: facebookBenedict Rogers Photo: facebook

Crude, racist abuse, deliberate misrepresentations, doctored images, misinformation and biased reporting have added a cruel twist to an already bloody tragedy.

Some people may call me biased, and to that charge I plead guilty. But I am biased not in favour of one community over another, in favour of one race or religion over another, in favour of one particular political party over another. Instead, I am biased in favour of the universal values of human rights, including religious freedom.

I am biased in favour of mutual respect, equal rights, peace and harmony between religions and races. I am biased in favour of the dignity of each and every human being, whatever their ethnicity or religion. I am biased against intolerance, hatred, racism and extremism.

The tragedy in Arakan State is that ordinary people from both Rakhine and Rohingya communities have suffered. Homes burned, mosques desecrated, women raped, people killed – and for what purpose? It has been claimed that as many as 30,000 people are displaced as a result of the violence, although this figure is not verified because the UN has vacated its staff and independent monitors have not had access to the area. One of the first things the government of Burma should do is allow international monitors in to assess the situation.

I am writing this as a friend of Burma and all of Burma’s people. I have worked for the cause of freedom, democracy and human rights in Burma for the past 15 years, and travelled more than 40 times inside the country and to all its borders. I have worked with Burmese democracy activists and former political prisoners, and with Karen, Karenni, Shan, Mon, Kachin, Chin, Rakhine and Rohingya people. I also write as someone with extensive experience of other countries where religious intolerance is growing, often from extremist Islamism: Indonesia, Pakistan and The Maldives, in particular.

And so with that background, I appeal to the government and people of Burma not only to stop the violence, but to change the attitudes of religious intolerance and racial hatred which have come to the fore in the past few weeks. I appeal to the people of Burma to be true to everything that is good and noble in Burmese and Buddhist culture, and to live up to the values of freedom and human rights for which they have been struggling. I make this appeal on several grounds.

First, I appeal to human conscience on the grounds of humanity and human rights. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is exactly that: universal, for everyone. As Aung San Suu Kyi said in her Nobel Peace Prize Lecture last Saturday, human rights are “the birthright of all”. No human being should be degraded, restricted or abused in the way the people of Burma have been by the military regime for so long – and that includes the Rohingya people.

Second, I appeal on religious grounds. From my basic understanding of Buddhism, I know that there is a principle called “metta” – “loving kindness.” It is similar to the principle in my own faith, Christianity, of “love your neighbour as yourself.” In Christianity, we are also taught to “love your enemies.” Neighbour or ‘enemy,’ Rakhine or Rohingya, Buddhist, Christian, Muslim or Animist, shouldn’t we apply “metta,” “love,” to all?

Last, if simple humanity, basic human rights and core religious teachings cannot persuade people to exercise love, tolerance, respect and peace, to safeguard equal rights for all, then I appeal on grounds of self-interest.

If what I have said so far has not upset some, what I am about to say will upset others, but I must say it anyway. The Rohingya people are among the most marginalised and persecuted people I have ever come across. I have visited Rohingya refugees on the Bangladesh-Burma border, and seen the despair in their eyes. I have met Rohingya refugees outside the region, and seen the depression in their hearts. The Rohingyas I know are among the most hospitable, kind, gentle, decent, tolerant, peace-loving human beings I have met. They have clung on to human decency, even when others have tried to deny them human dignity.

But I also know there is a danger ahead if they continue to be marginalized and persecuted not only by the regime, but by society as well, and it is this: the danger of radicalization.

The charge of ‘terrorist’ is already thrown at the Rohingyas, without any foundation or substance and fuelled by bigotry. But it could be a self-fulfilling prophecy. If the Rohingyas are persecuted by the regime, marginalised by the democracy movement, discriminated against and attacked by society and ignored by the international community, if radical Islamist organizations tap into the seething despair among the Rohingya people, and the Rohingyas feel they have nowhere else to turn, then it is possible that more Rohingyas could be radicalized. Having seen radical Islamism in action in Pakistan, Indonesia, The Maldives and on the streets of London, to name just a few places, I fear for Burma if it is added to its woes. I am not talking about bombs and hijackings. I am talking about the ideology of political Islam, Islamism, as distinct from the religion of Islam followed by the vast majority of Muslims who adhere to the peaceful teachings of their faith.

Marginalization, despair, statelessness could be a breeding ground for radicalization. As Aung San Suu Kyi said in Oslo, “War is not the only arena where peace is done to death. Wherever suffering is ignored, there will be the seeds of conflict, for suffering degrades and embitters and enrages.”

Don’t misunderstand me. What I have said must not be used to justify attacks on the Rohingyas. Indeed, quite the opposite. To avoid provoking Islamism, the Rakhine, the Burmans and the whole people of Burma should work with moderate-minded Rohingyas whose only desire is to be given the same rights as others, to be treated with respect and dignity, to live in peace. One Rohingya several years ago described his vision beautifully to me when he described Burma as a garden, in which various different flowers grow – and the Rohingyas are one of those flowers.

There are two myths about the Rohingyas that need to be dispelled. The first is the idea that ethnicity or race is tied to land or state. The Rohingyas are not seeking their own territory, or at least not the ones I know. They just want to be recognized as citizens of Burma. Even if they were demanding their own state, there is no reason to grant them that, as long as they are treated with dignity and equal rights.

The second is the idea that they are Bengali illegal immigrants. To this charge I have several responses.

First, the historical record is clear that the Rohingyas have lived in northern Arakan for generations. Scholars can debate the precise record with civility and evidence, but however many years it is, no one can doubt that they have been there for generations. The first President of Burma, Sao Shwe Thaike, a Shan, said that the “Muslims of Arakan certainly belong to the indigenous races of Burma. If they do not belong to the indigenous races, we also cannot be taken as indigenous races.” Burma’s first Prime Minister U Nu, who used the disputed term ‘Rohingya,’ authorized the Burmese Broadcasting Service to broadcast in the Rohingya language, and Rohingyas sat in Parliament. It was only when Ne Win took power, driven largely by his own racist and anti-Muslim prejudice, that they were stripped of their citizenship and plunged into decades of abuse.

If they were illegal immigrants from Bangladesh, why do so many of them speak Burmese fluently and have Burmese names? If they were immigrants from Bangladesh, why does Bangladesh refuse them refuge when they flee Burma? If they were immigrants from Bangladesh, why do they wish to stay in Burma and make it their homeland, when all they receive is abuse? Illegal immigrants usually flee poverty and oppression to places of relative prosperity and freedom – why then would people flee Bangladesh for Burma?

Some Burmese have told me that it is a porous border and some who claim to be ‘Rohingya’ may be illegal Bengali immigrants. If that is so, then Burma needs to establish a proper system for identifying people. Those who were born in Burma must be treated as citizens. Those who are found, credibly, to be migrants should be processed appropriately and either given citizenship or returned to their country of origin, in the same way any country handles illegal immigration. What must not happen, in any circumstance, is the kind of inhumane, degrading abuse to which these people are subjected. Even illegal immigrants have human rights.

Martin Luther King expressed it well when he said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” The Rohingya people, stateless, denied access to education, facing restrictions on movement, marriage and religion, have been facing a grave injustice for years. The Rakhine people, like others in Burma, have been suffering injustice too. And both communities, indulging in a depraved cycle of violence and destruction, will destroy each other and derail democracy for Burma if the current crisis continues.

So it is time for everyone, in Burma and in the international community, who cares about universal human rights, human dignity and peace, to stand up and put an end to the violence, and begin the long hard road to reconstruction and reconciliation.

Today there is a need for emergency humanitarian aid for all the victims of the violence, who have lost homes and are without food or drinking water.

Tomorrow, there will be a need for support for inter-faith and inter-ethnic dialogue and reconciliation. A starting point would be for us all to reflect on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s words in her Nobel Lecture: “Ultimately our aim should be to create a world free from the displaced, the homeless and the hopeless, a world of which each and every corner is a true sanctuary where the inhabitants will have the freedom and the capacity to live in peace. Every thought, every word, and every action that adds to the positive and the wholesome is a contribution to peace. Each and every one of us is capable of making such a contribution. Let us join hands to try to create a peaceful world where we can sleep in security and wake in happiness.”

Let that be the way forward, for Burman, Rakhine, Rohingya, for government official and political prisoner, for Burmese citizen and foreign friends of Burma alike.

Benedict-Rogers-commentary-sBenedict Rogers’ new book, “Burma: A Nation at the Crossroads,” is published this month by Rider.

Media Statement – Support for Rohingya

Restless Beings

Source from : http://www.restlessbeings.org/projects/rohingya/media-statement

Media Statement – Support for Rohingya

This article available in French, Spanish and Turkish

English

We are preparing for a press conference on July 23rd 2012 to urge local, national and international press to upscale their exposure and reporting from Burma following ethnic clashes which broke out in June.

It is thought that wide scale ethnic cleansing is now taking place in the state of Myanmar with little aid being received and no international journalists able to report from there.

The statement below is addressed to Media and Press Chiefs asking them to use their power and influence to increase reporting from the region with the hope that international community pressure on the Burma regime can bring peace, stability and citizenship to the Rohingya – one of the world’s most persecuted communities.

If you are looking to report latest developments or would like to book your place for a press pass for the press conference, please email us with your details at rohingya@restlessbeings.org.

We are currently communicating with many community organisations who wish to voice their demand for a change to the situation in Burma – if you would like your organisation to become a signatory to the statement below please send us an email to rohingya@restlessbeings.org with your logo, a short statement of support and the community reach of your organisation (numerically) before 19th July.

Text_logoFAO Head of Current Affairs and World News
World Media And News Agencies

Dear Sir/Madam

We are writing to you regarding the growing humanitarian crisis in Myanmar following ethnic clashes between Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims in Arakan state.

The Rohingya have faced persecution for over five decades now and over time a growing resentment and racial hatred for Rohingya in the region has been spreading. This anti-Rohingyan sentiment came to the fore in clashes in early June and initially the media did report on the unrest. However, since then, the UN and other international NGO’s have pulled out of Arakan state and as such no international observers remain on the ground. The Rohingya are being targeted because of their race and religion. Reports from inside Arakan state suggest that more than 90,000 Rohingya have been displaced with as many as 27,000 feared dead. Mass rape, looting, burning of villages, arrests of young Rohingya men indiscriminately as well as horrific images of children being burnt by Rakhine and NaSaKa lead to a picture which compares to that of Rwandan, Kashmiri and even Bosninan ethnic cleansing.

We, collectively, urge you to help shed light on the plight of the Rohingya and to use your voice, influence and power as media and news corporations to end the blackout of coverage from Arakan. This will enable accountability, an end to hostilities, and call for compliance with universally accepted international human rights standards and customary international law; which are currently being breached. The issue has been described by many as sectarian or ethnic clashes, with many calling for politics to be used to resolve this issue. We urge you from purely a humanitarian point of view to report according to international standards that is without bias and discrimination on the issue. This issue is much larger than a Myanmar only problem; no longer regional to South East Asia and does not affect only Myanmar and Bangladesh, but affects every single one of us globally as humans.

We represent our communities from a plethora of religious, cultural, societal, political and racial backgrounds – it is of concern to all of us, equally. Our collective voice cannot be ignored.

Aside all politics and legalities, this is a matter of basic human rights that we all share, and cannot ignore and we hope that in human spirit you are able to raise awareness of this issue and as a result end the needless massacre that is happening today. We feel it is important to act now to make sure that we do not watch the horrors of ethnic cleansing like we did in Rwanda or Bosnia – history has taught us enough lessons.

Thank you in advance

The Undersigned

Español

Estamos actualmente en comunicación con muchas organizaciones comunitarias que desean dar voz a su demanda de un cambio en la situación de Birmania . Si ustedes desean que su organización figure como firmante en el comunicado de prensa siguiente, por favor envíen un e-mail a rohingya@restlessbeings.org con su logo, un breve comunicado de apoyo, y el alcance comunitario de su organización (en cifras) antes del próximo 19 de julio.

Text_logoDIRECTOR DE ASUNTOS DE ACTUALIDAD Y NOTICIAS MUNDIALES (FAO)
AGENCIAS DE NOTICIAS Y MEDIOS DE COMUNICACIÓN DEL MUNDO

Estimado Sr. / Sra.

Nos dirigimos a Ud. en relación con la creciente crisis humanitaria en Myanmar como consecuencia de los conflictos étnicos entre los budistas Rakhine y los musulmanes Rohingya en el estado de Arakar.

Los Rohingya han sufrido persecución desde hace cinco décadas, y con el tiempo se ha ido desarrollando un creciente resentimiento, y el odio racial hacia los Rohingya se ha ido extendiendo por la región.

Este sentimiento anti-Rohingya saltó al foro por los enfrentamientos a principios de junio, e inicialmente los medios de comunicación informaron sobre ellos. Sin embargo, desde entonces, la ONU y otras ONG se han retirado del estado de Arakan, y no hay observadores internacionales como tal que permanezcan sobre el terreno. Los Rohingya están siendo un objetivo por su raza y religión. Algunos informes desde dentro de Arakan sugieren que hay más de 90.000 Rohingya desplazados, y se teme que hayan muerto unos 27.000. Violaciones en masa, pillaje, quema de poblaciones, arrestos indiscriminados de hombres jóvenes Rohingya, así como horripilantes imágenes de niños quemados por los Rakhine y NaSaKa, nos dejan un cuadro que se compara a las limpiezas étnicas de Ruanda, Cachemira, e incluso, Bosnia.

Nosotros, colectivamente, les apremiamos a ayudar a arrojar luz en el conflicto de los Rohingya, y usar sus voces, influencia y poder en los medios de comunicación y corporaciones de noticias, para terminar con el apagón informativo desde Arakan. Esto permitiría depurar responsabilidades, poner término a las hostilidades, y pedir el cumplimiento de los universalmente aceptados derechos humanos y las usuales leyes internacionales, los cuales están siendo infringidos actualmente. Este asunto ha sido descrito por muchos como conflicto étnico o sectario, y son muchos también los que piden que se use la política para resolver este tema. Les rogamos que informen, desde un punto de vista puramente humanitario, y de acuerdo con los estándares internacionales, sin prejuicios ni discriminación, sobre este asunto. Esto es mucho más que un problema exclusivo de Myanmar,ya no sólo regional del Sudeste Asiático, , y no sólo afecta a Myanmar y Bangladesh, sino que nos afecta globalmente a todos y cada uno de nosotros, en tanto que seres humanos.

Nosotros representamos a nuestras comunidades, desde una plétora de entornos religiosos, culturales, sociales, políticos y raciales. Nos concierne a todos por igual. Nuestra voz colectiva no puede ser ignorada.

Dejando aparte políticas y legalismos, es un asunto de derechos humanos básicos, que todos compartimos y no podemos ignorar, y esperamos que por espíritu humano ustedes sean capaces de despertar conciencia sobre este tema, y como resultado terminen las masacres que están ocurriendo hoy. Sentimos que es importante actuar ahora, para asegurarnos de no contemplar los horrores de las limpiezas étnicas, como ya hicimos en Ruanda o Bosnia, la historia nos ha enseñado ya bastantes lecciones.

Gracias de antemano,

Los abajo firmantes.

Türk

Birmanya da Haziran ayinda cikan etnik catismlar ardindan orda ki olaylarinin raporlamasini yukseltmek icin 23 Temmuzda yerel, ulusal ve uluslar arasi gazeteci arkadaslarimizi basin cagrisina davet ediyoruz.

Genis capta etnik temizlik gerceklesmekte olan Myanmara hicbir sekilde yardim ulastiramiyoruz ve uluslar arasi gazetecilerimizi Myanmar devleti sinir ici almadiklari icin orda haber alamiyoruz.

Asagda ki bildirme medya ve basin mudurlerine yoneliktir. Bildirmede soz edilen mudurlerin sahip olduklari pozisyondan dolayi elde ettikleri guc ve etkilerini kullanarak bu bolgeyle alakali haberin sayisini arttirmalarini istiyoruz. Umut ediyorzki bu haberler sayesinde uluslar arasi toplumdan gelen baskiyla Rohingya milletine baris ve istikrarli bir hayat sunabilicegiz.

Eger son gelismeleri rapor etmek yada basin toplantisi icin basin karti istiyorsaniz bilgilerini bize e-posta yoluya rohingya@restlessbeings.org adresine gonderiniz.

Text_logoGüncel Olaylar ve Dünya Haberleri Başkanı
Dünya Medya ve Haber Ajansları (FAO)

Sayin Bay/Bayan

Arakan eyaletinde Rakhine Budistler ve Rohingya Muslumanlar arasinda etbik catisma ardindan Myanmarda buyuyen insani kriz ile ilgili olarak size yaziyoruz.

Rohingya milleti beş yıldır zulme karşı karşiya kalmişlardir. Giderek artan irkiclik ve nefret yayilmaktadir. Bu anti-Rohingya duygulari Haziran basinda catismalarla on plana cikti ve ilk huzursuzluklar hicbir sekilde haber yapilmadi. Ancak, o zamandan bu yana BM ve diğer uluslararası sivil toplumlar Arakan devletinden çekildiler ve herhandi bir uluslararası gözlemci kalmamıştır. Rohingya milleti irk ve dinden dolayi hedef alinmaktadir. Arakan devleti içinden raporlar 90,000 den fazla Rohingyali evlerinden edilmis ve 27,000 den fazla olu saniliyor. Tecavuz, koylerin yakilmasi, yagma, cocuk yetiskin ayirmaksizin saldirilarin vahsiligi Bosnak, Kasmir ve Ruanda etnik catismalarina benzetiliyor.

Biz, topluca Rohingya milletininin kotu durumuna isik tutmak icin size ihtiyacimiz var. Arakan devletinin getirdigi medya yasaklarinin medya ve haber sirketleri olarak sizing guclu sesinizle sona erdirebiliriz. Topluca, sesimizle dusmanliklara son ve evrensel olarak Kabul edilmis uluslararasi insan haklari standartlari ve geleneksel hukuk ile uyum icinde yasamalari icin davet edebilirz.

Bu sorununun sadece politik yollarla cozulebilecegini dusunun yuzlerce insane var ama biz size sadece insancil, yardimsever insanlar olarak size sesleniyoruz. Irk, din mezhep onemsemeden sadece uluslararasi insan haklari standartlarina uyum saglamalarini istiyoruz. Bu sorun Myanmar, Birminyadan cok daha buyuk bir sorun. Sadece Uzak Dogu yu ve Asya yi etkileyen bir durum degil, butun insanligi tek tek etkileyen bir sorundan bahsediyoruz.

Dini, kulturel, siyasal ve irksal kokenler e bakmadan, her toplum hepimizi esit ilgilendirmektedir. Ortak sesimiz goz ardi edilemez.

Siyasi ve hukuki durumlar yanisira bu hepimizin paylastigi ve gormezden gelemeyecegimiz temel insan haklari meselesidir. Icinizde bu sorunun farkindaligini artirmak istiyeceginizi umuyoruz ve sonuc olarak bu insanlik disi etnik temizlemenin sonunu getirmemize yardimci olursunuz.

Tarihten birseyler ogrendiysek harekat zamaninin simdi olduguna inaniyoruz. Bir Bosnak veya Ruanda gibi insanlik disi resimler elimize daha fazla gecmesin.

Simdiden tesekurlerimizi ifade ediyoruz.

Imzasi

Français

Nous nous préparons à une conférence de presse le 23 Juillet 2012 afin d’exhorter la presse locale, nationale et internationale à exposer largement les rapports sur la Birmanie à la suite des affrontements ethniques qui ont éclaté en Juin.

On pense que l’échelle d’épuration ethnique est en train de prendre place dans l’état du Myanmar avec peu d’aide reçue et sans qu’aucun des journalistes internationaux ne soit capable de rendre compte de la situation à partir de là.

La déclaration ci-dessous est adressée aux médias afin de leur demander d’utiliser leur pouvoir et influence avec l’espoir que la pression de la communauté internationale sur le régime birman peut apporter la paix, la stabilité et la citoyenneté aux Rohingya – l’une des communautés les plus persécutés au monde.

Si vous cherchez à rendre compte des derniers développements ou si vous souhaitez réserver votre carte de presse pour la conférence, veuillez nous envoyer un courriel avec vos coordonnées à rohingya@restlessbeings.org.

Nous sommes en train de communiquer avec de nombreux organismes communautaires qui souhaitent exprimer leur demande pour un changement de la situation en Birmanie – si vous souhaitez que votre organisation devienne signataire de la déclaration ci-dessous, envoyez-nous un e-mail à rohingya@restlessbeings.org avec votre logo, une brève déclaration de soutien et de la portée communautaire de votre organisation (numériquement) avant le 19 Juillet.

Text_logoChef des Actualités de la FAO à l’Actualité Mondiale
Médias internationaux et Agences de Presse

Madame, Monsieur,

Nous vous écrivons au sujet de la crise humanitaire croissante au Myanmar à la suite des affrontements ethniques entre les bouddhistes Rakhine et les musulmans Rohingyas dans l’État d’Arakan.

Les Rohingyas ont été persécutés pendant plus de cinq décennies et au fil du temps un ressentiment croissant et une haine raciale envers les Rohingya dans la région ont été entretenus. Ce sentiment anti-rohingyan s’est imposé dans des affrontements au début du mois de Juin et tout d’abord, les médias ont fait rapport des troubles. Cependant, depuis lors, l’ONU et d’autres ONG internationales se sont retirées de l’État d’Arakan et par conséquent aucun observateur international ne reste sur le terrain. Les Rohingyas sont pris pour cible en raison de leur race et de leur religion. Des rapports de l’État d’Arakan suggèrent que plus de 90 000 Rohingyas ont été déplacés et on craint 27 000 morts. Des viols en masse, pillages, incendies de villages, arrestations de jeunes hommes rohingyas de manière indiscriminée ainsi que des images horribles d’enfants brûlés par Rakhine et NaSaKa conduisant à une image comparable à celle de l’épuration ethnique au Rwanda, au Cachemire ou encore en Bosnie.

Nous, collectivement, vous invitons à faire lumière sur le sort des Rohingyas et d’utiliser votre voix, influence et pouvoir afin que les médias et la presse mettent fin à la panne de la couverture de l’Arakan. Cela permettra la reddition des comptes, la fin des hostilités, et l’appel à la conformité avec les normes internationales universellement reconnues des droits de l’homme et du droit international coutumier, qui sont actuellement violées. Le problème a été décrit par beaucoup comme des affrontements sectaires ou ethniques. Nombreux souhaitent que la politique soit utilisée pour résoudre ce problème. Nous vous demandons instamment, purement d’un point de vue humanitaire, à faire rapport de la situation selon les normes internationales et donc sans préjugés et sans discrimination sur la question. Cette question est beaucoup plus grande que le seul problème de Myanmar, elle n’est pas non plus régionale et particulière à l’Asie du Sud Est, elle n’affecte pas seulement le Myanmar et le Bangladesh, mais elle affecte chacun de nous au niveau mondial en tant qu’êtres humains.

Nous représentons nos communautés à partir d’une pléthore de milieux religieux, culturels, sociétaux, politiques et raciaux – ceci est source de préoccupation pour nous tous, égalitairement. Notre voix collective ne peut être ignorée.

Outre toutes les politiques et les aspects juridiques, c’est une question de Droits de l’Homme fondamentale que nous partageons tous et que l’on ne peut ignorer. Nous espérons que vous serez en mesure de prendre conscience de ce problème et par conséquent que le massacre inutile qui se passe aujourd’hui prenne fin. Nous pensons qu’il est important d’agir maintenant afin de nous assurer que nous ne regardons pas les horreurs de cette épuration ethnique, comme nous l’avons fait au Rwanda ou en Bosnie. L’histoire nous a enseigné assez de leçons.

Merci par avance.

Les Signataires

 

Bangladesh tells Burmese ambassador to take back Rohingyas

Bangladesh tells Burmese ambassador to take back Rohingyas

Thursday, 19 July 2012 10:35 Mizzima News
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Source from :   http://www.mizzima.com/news/regional/7554-bangladesh-tells-burmese-ambassador-to-take-back-rohingyas.html
The Bangladesh Foreign Minister Dr. Dipu Moni told the Burmese ambassador on Wednesday, “Rohingyas are your citizens, and it is your concern to take them back in Myanmar from Bangladesh.”

Bangladesh 
Foreign Minister Dr. Dipu Moni  Photo: WikipediaBangladesh Foreign Minister Dr. Dipu Moni Photo: Wikipedia

Dipu Moni told Ambassador Myo Myint Than that Burma has a responsibility to repatriate Rohingya refugees, who are estimated to number as high as 500,000, in order to strengthen the bilateral relationship, according to BSS, the national news agency of Bangladesh.

Burma’s President Thein Sein is scheduled to visit Bangladesh sometime after Ramadan, which starts on Friday and continues for 30 days.

Bangladesh would offer assistance to start the repatriation process that has remained stalled for decades, the foreign minister said.

Official statistics show nearly 30,000 documented Rohingya refugees and 450,000 undocumented refugees, many of whom left Burma in the early 1990s to avoid persecution, now reside in Bangladesh, often in squalid camps and makeshift settlements. Rohingyas are denied citizenship in Burma, and the UN says the group is among the most persecuted in the world.

The foreign minister urged Burma to solve the refuge problem and said it appreciated the steps the government took to quell the sectarian unrest that swept over Arakan State during the past six weeks.

The foreign minister said Rohingyas used to live in Arakan [now Rakhine] State and they still prefer to be identified as Burmese nationals.

Bangladesh has come under strong international pressure to accept Rohingya refugees who tried to flee Burma during the recent violence, which saw up to 79 people die and 3,000 homes and businesses burned.

Up to 50,000 Royingya Muslims and Burmese Buddhist are now in refugee camps in Rakhine State, where an international humanitarian operation is underway to provide food, shelter and medicine.

A solution to the Rohingya refugee issue will prove difficult to solve.

Last week, President Thein Sein told a UN refugee official that that non-citizen Rohingya Muslims in far western Burma should be placed in refugee camps or deported.

The U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres rejected the suggestion, saying it was not the UN’s job to resettle the Rohingya.

“The resettlement programs organized by UNHCR are for refugees who are fleeing a country to another, in very specific circumstances. Obviously, it’s not related to this situation,” Guterres told the media after a meeting with the president.

Thein Sein said that Rohingya were not welcome in Burma.

“We will take responsibility for our ethnic people, but it is impossible to accept the illegally entered Rohingyas, who are not our ethnicity,” he told Guterres, according to the president’s official website.

The president said the move was the “only solution.” Within Burma, there is widespread resentment against the Rohingyas – who number around 800,000 in Burma –and who are called “Bengali” by most Burmese.

“We will send them away if any third country would accept them,” Thein Sein said. “This is what we are thinking is the solution to the issue.”