Suu Kyi: Myanmar needs ‘national reconciliation and peace’

Suu Kyi: Myanmar needs ‘national reconciliation and peace’

Now PlayingRohingya Muslims…
Rohingya Muslims targeted in Myanmar 02:26

Story highlights

  • Suu Kyi has not directly addressed the ongoing crackdown in Rakhine state
  • She told an audience in Singapore that Myanmar must work to achieve peace

(CNN)Myanmar has to “achieve peace,” the country’s figurehead Aung San Suu Kyi said Wednesday, amid accusations that her government is leading a brutal crackdown against the Rohingya Muslim minority.

As former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan flew to volatile northern Rakhine state, where most of Myanmar’s Rohingyas live, Suu Kyi called for “national reconciliation”.
Annan’s trip comes less than a day after the UN’s Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Adama Dieng, expressed alarm at reports of a crackdown against the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority.
“These allegations must be verified as a matter of urgency,” Dieng said in a statement on Tuesday. “If they are true, the lives of thousands of people are at risk.”

Alleged murder, rape

Following an attack on Myanmar’s security forces by armed men in October and subsequent crackdown, human rights group have reported mass killings, rape and destruction of villages.
Observers estimate the death toll could be in the hundreds, a number difficult to verify since the government has barred journalists and human rights monitors from the province.
In a statement issued on November 15, Annan said he was deeply concerned by the new reports of killings and called for security forces to act in accordance with the law.
“Violence will not create an environment conducive to peace and inter-communal cohesion, which is a prerequisite for economic progress and prosperity,” he said.
The Kofi Annan Foundation had already established the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State, in cooperation with the Myanmar government, before the recent violence began.
The Commission’s purpose, according to the government, is to find “lasting solution to the complex and delicate issues in the Rakhine State.”

Aung San Suu Kyi heads to Singapore

Aung San Suu Kyi on rising from dissident to leader

Aung San Suu Kyi on rising from dissident to leader 00:32
As Annan flies in Myanmar’s capital Yangon, Suu Kyi is on a three-day trip to Singapore.
She has been criticized for not addressing the violence in Rakhine directly in the past month.
“I don’t have words to describe the disappointment with her government,” Bangkok-based Fortify Rights Founder Matthew Smith told CNN last week.
“That the government has simply flatly denied human rights violations are taking place does not bode well for the National League for Democracy (NLD).”
Though she did not address the situation in Rakhine directly, Suu Kyi said Wednesday that “national reconciliation and peace is unavoidably important for us.”
“We have to achieve peace and national reconciliation that our country may be able to progress,” she told an audience in Singapore.
Asked by reporters following the event about UN criticism, Suu Kyi did not comment.
Although Suu Kyi’s NLD party won a landslide victory in Myanmar’s 2015 election, the military still maintains a significant hold on power with a mandatory 25% of seats.

International protests, condemnation

Rohingya families flee persecution in Myanmar

Rohingya families flee persecution in Myanmar 02:53
International outrage continues to grow around increasingly serious reports from human rights groups of abuses in Rakhine.
In his statement on Tuesday, Dieng said Myanmar’s leaders had to allow international observers into to assess the situation in the province.
“The government needs, once and for all, to find a sustainable solution to the situation of the Rohingya Muslims and other religious and ethnic minorities in Myanmar, a solution that is in full compliance with … international human rights standards,” he said.
UN refugee agency official John McKissack told CNN this month the Myanmar military appeared to be “ethnically cleansing” the Rohingya population.
In New York, a protest is planned for Wednesday local time by community leaders and organizations opposed to what they say is the “mass killing” of Myanmar’s Rohingya.
Malaysia’s foreign minister Anifah Aman said in a statement this week he would meet with Suu Kyi over the “ethnic cleansing” in Rakhine, while Canada’s foreign minister Stephane Dion tweeted on Saturday he was “deeply concerned” by the violence against Myanmar’s Rohingya minority.
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By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

Burma Edges Closer to Ethnic Cleansing Witness all the hallmarks of the tragedies in Bosnia, Darfur, Kosovo, Rwanda.

Burma Edges Closer to Ethnic Cleansing

Witness all the hallmarks of the tragedies in Bosnia, Darfur, Kosovo, Rwanda.

Migrants, including Myanmar's Rohingya Muslims, wait to be rescued by Acehnese fishermen on the sea off East Aceh, Indonesia.ENLARGE
Migrants, including Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims, wait to be rescued by Acehnese fishermen on the sea off East Aceh, Indonesia.PHOTO: ASSOCIATED PRESS

A human tragedy approaching ethnic cleansing is unfolding in Burma, and the world is chillingly silent.

In recent weeks, hundreds of Muslim Rohingya people have been killed, and more than 30,000 displaced. Houses have been burned, hundreds of women raped and many others arbitrarily arrested. Access for humanitarian-aid organizations has been almost completely denied. Thousands have fled to neighboring Bangladesh, only to be sent back. Witness all the hallmarks of past tragedies: Bosnia, Darfur, Kosovo, Rwanda.

This isn’t the first explosion of violence against the Rohingyas, who are among the world’s most persecuted minorities. For decades these Burma-based Muslims have been subjected to a campaign of grinding dehumanization. In 1982, they were stripped of their citizenship rights and rendered stateless, with restrictions on movement, marriage, education and religious freedom.

The Burmese government and military claims that the Rohingyas are in fact illegal Bengali immigrants. But Bangladesh doesn’t recognize them. As some Rohingyas say, “We are trapped between a crocodile and a snake.”

Their plight intensified in 2012 when two severe outbreaks of violence resulted in the displacement of hundreds of thousands and a new apartheid emerged between Rohingya Muslims and their Rakhine Buddhist neighbors. Conditions have since become increasingly dire.

The latest episode was sparked by an Oct. 9 attack on Burmese border-police posts, which killed nine officers. While no conclusive findings have been made about the attack, Burma’s military alleges that a group of Rohingyas were the perpetrators.

Even if that were true, the military’s response has been grossly disproportionate. Rounding up suspects, interrogating them and putting them on trial would be one thing. It’s quite another to reportedly unleash helicopter gunships on civilians, rape women and throw babies into a fire.

According to one Rohingya interviewed by Amnesty International, the military “shot at people who were fleeing. They surrounded the village and started going from house to house. They were verbally abusing the people. They were threatening to rape the women.”

Another witness described how her two sons were arbitrarily arrested: “It was early in the morning, the military surrounded our house, while some came in and forced me and my children to go outside. They tied my two sons up. They tied their hands behind their backs, and they were beaten badly. The military kicked them in the chest. I saw it myself. I was crying so loudly. When I cried, they pointed a gun at me. My children were begging the military not to hit them. They were beaten for around 30 minutes before being taken away.” She hasn’t seen them since.

Two people may be able to prevent this crisis from further deteriorating: Burma’s de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Ms. Suu Kyi is already facing increasing criticism for her failure to act, though she faces severe constraints. She won an electoral mandate last year and runs Burma’s first democratically led government in more than half a century, but the military still holds enormous power. Under Burma’s constitution, the ministries of home affairs, border affairs and defense remain in military hands. Her caution is thus understandable, denying the military any pretext to destabilize her new and fragile government. But the priority must be to save lives and prevent a humanitarian catastrophe.

In September, Ms. Suu Kyi invited former U.N. chief Kofi Annan to head a commission and find solutions to the Rohingyas’ plight. But her response to the latest abuses has been disappointing. At the very least, she should lift all restrictions on humanitarian aid so that people can receive emergency assistance. She should allow access for journalists and human-rights monitors, and set up an independent, international inquiry to establish the truth about the current situation. She should call for an end to mass attacks on civilians.

As for Mr. Ban, his visit and negotiations to lift the military regime’s block on international aid after Cyclone Nargis hit Burma in 2008 saved thousands of lives. In his final weeks in office, he should repeat this strategy: Go to Burma and, using his good offices, bring together Ms. Suu Kyi, the military and the Rakhine state authorities and insist on humanitarian access.

John McKissick, head of the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees on the Bangladesh side of the border, has accused Burma’s government of ethnic cleansing. The U.N.’s special rapporteur on human rights in Burma, Yanghee Lee, has condemned the lockdown on Rakhine State as “unacceptable.” It’s time for action from the very top.

It’s also time for the international community to speak out. If we fail to act, Rohingyas may starve to death if they aren’t killed by bullets first. We could end up as passive observers once again wringing our hands belatedly, saying “never again.”

Let us act now before it’s too late.

Mr. Ramos-Horta is a Nobel Peace Prize laureate and former president of East Timor. Mr. Rogers is the East Asia team leader at Christian Solidarity Worldwide and author of “Burma: A Nation at the Crossroads” (Random House, 2015).

Source by: http://www.wsj.com/articles/burma-edges-closer-to-ethnic-cleansing-1480528807

By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

Buddhist monk posts message of tolerance after visiting ‘Nowhere People’ exhibit

Buddhist monk posts message of tolerance after visiting ‘Nowhere People’ exhibit

By Coconuts Yangon November 30, 2016 / 14:12 MMTbuddhist monk rohingya rakhine state tolerance nowhere people greg constantine yangon
Buddhist monk Ashin Khantisara explores the Nowhere People exhibit at the Myanmar Deitta gallery in Yangon. Photo: Ashin Khantisara / Facebook

 

Have you ever imagined being a stateless person who lost a country?
This sort of thinking is a kind of thought from one person to another.
But our weakness is that we are not able to think about another person.
A worse weakness is that we are not able to think about another creature.
The worst weakness is that we don’t even think of ‘If I were a part of a stateless society.’

Buddhist monk Ashin Khantisara posted this heartfelt message on Facebook after visiting the Nowhere People exhibit at the Myanmar Deitta gallery in Yangon this week. He was joined by a group of monks from a local religious university.

Myanmar Deitta hosted Nowhere People – a photography exhibit that explores the lives of stateless people around the world – from November 13 to 27.

The 10-year project by photographer Greg Constantine includes images and stories of stateless people in 18 countries, including members of Myanmar’s Muslim Rohingya community, who are collectively denied citizenship and whose communities in northern Rakhine State have been under a brutal military crackdown since October 9.

According to the gallery’s website, Nowhere People aims to reveal the human face of statelessness as well as the lengths stateless people will go to survive and find a place in society. Nowhere People provides tangible documentation and proof of a global issue that has been ignored for far too long.

Presumably because of his work with the Rohingya community, Constantine was denied entry into Myanmar after he landed at the Yangon International Airport on November 11 after being told by immigration officials that he was on a blacklist.

Part of Nowhere People will be exhibited at the UK House of Commons under the title “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” from November 28 to December 2.

When asked how the exhibit had affected him, Ashin Khantisara told Coconuts Yangon: “To be honest, it made me amazed and feel the suffering of these people. And I thought if I were these people, what would I do? Such thought surely gave rise to sympathy for them in my heart.”

Facebook is the preferred medium for propagating hate speech by other Buddhist nationalist monks in Myanmar. This monk’s message is a welcome departure from that dangerous trend.

buddhist monk rohingya rakhine state tolerance nowhere people greg constantine yangon

Source by: http://yangon.coconuts.co/2016/11/30/buddhist-monk-posts-message-tolerance-after-visiting-nowhere-people-exhibit

By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

In Myanmar, genocide looms as the world waits on Suu Kyi

In Myanmar, genocide looms as the world waits on Suu Kyi

Tej Parikh NOVEMBER 30, 2016 12:49 AM (UTC+8)
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If Syria and Yemen weren’t enough to illustrate the depressing state that global humanitarianism finds itself in today, look no further than Myanmar.

A year after a comprehensive report was published by the London-based International State Crime Initiative, suggesting the nation’s long-oppressed Rohingya “face the final stages of genocide,” and 6 months into human rights icon Aung San Suu Kyi’s de-facto leadership, the minority ethnic group finds itself, yet again, under siege.

Yet beyond harsh words, calls for an independent investigation, and crossed fingers for a convicted Suu Kyi intervention, the international community has been frustratingly helpless—and useless. Human rights observers, humanitarian aid, and journalists have all been barred by the government from entering Rakhine state—where the violence has been taking place—while in May, Suu Kyi asked for “enough space” to address the Rohingya’s plight.

But the clock is ticking ever faster. Last month, the Burmese army launched a large counter operation in Rakhine after officials accused a militant Rohingya group for the deaths of  nine border guards. And since, satellite images released by Human Rights Watch show that over 1,200 of their homes had been razed, over 100 have been killed, according to activist groups, women have been systematically raped, and thousands more have been displaced. The government denies the severity of the allegations.

The fresh reports of conflict compounds the historic atrocities the Muslim ethnic group have faced. Facing religious persecution, economic exclusion, and unrecognized by successive government’s—including Suu Kyi’s—various attempts to flee have seen hundreds drown at sea, and thousands rendered homeless.

How much more space can be given? It’s clear Suu Kyi’s hands are tied. Acting, or even speaking out, against the injustices pits Myanmar’s state counselor against the military, who she must win-over in their fragile power-share. Meanwhile the electorate, and the nation’s influential Buddhist monk-hood, hold strong nationalist—and anti-Muslim—beliefs. And upsetting Myanmar’s fragile state of politics, risks destabilizing her National League for Democracy (NLD) party’s priority of economic development. Moreover, Suu Kyi has little control over what the military does.

But the Nobel Prize winner’s silent expedience (Suu Kyi considers herself primarily a politician, not an activist) is outrageously Machiavellian, and inexcusable, given the nature of warnings emanating from her country. Surely this wasn’t the vision of democracy she sacrificed decades of her life for?

And what more can be said of a international humanitarian system that vowed ‘never again’ after Rwanda, Bosnia, Syria, and Yemen, particularly in the week a UN refugee agency representative in neighboring Bangladesh—where the Rohingya have been fleeing to—said the Burmese government’s ultimate goal is “the ethnic cleansingof the Muslim minority in Myanmar.”

Diplomatic and political channels are now seemingly blunt, not to mention disproportionate, policy tools for the Rohingya’s increasingly desperate situation. And as the optimistic shine of the NLD’s election victory last year dims in the eye of the human rights community, the UN and national governments must see that the global ‘Responsibility to Protect’ threshold, has been breached, and shows little sign of being addressed, quickly enough, by the Burmese state apparatus.

The humanitarian system is evidently stretched this year—but that just means it must expand its capacity, improve its early warning systems, and sharpen its approaches. And concerning Myanmar, earlier this month, the UN Security Council discussed the violence, and called for a resumption of aid access to Rakhine and an international investigation. Though, crucially, it remains unclear whether the UN or national governments have a red-line, or a coherent strategy, for sending-in peacekeepers without sovereign consent—as has been the case for countless instances of state violence.

What is clear is that the Rohingya are not interested in being part of an arbitrary statistic, nor are they able to wait for business-like evidence cases to be drawn to justify their defense. Enough is already apparent. They’ve suffered for decades under oppressive governments, and it may just be too late to see if Suu Kyi’s will offer them any respite. Words have been too little for them. They need urgent action.

Source by: http://www.atimes.com/myanmar-genocide-looms-world-waits-suu-kyi//

By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

Aung San Suu Kyi calls for ‘peace and reconciliation’ in Burma yet still refuses to address Rohingya Muslim ‘genocide’

Aung San Suu Kyi calls for ‘peace and reconciliation’ in Burma yet still refuses to address Rohingya Muslim ‘genocide’

Reports the military gang raped, tortured and murdered Rohingya caused thousands of angry Muslims to take to the streets across Asia in protest

Taung-san-suu-kyi.jpgAung San Suu Kyi speaks during an official dinner function at the Istana on 30 November, 2016 in Singapore Suhaimi Abdullah/Getty Images

 

Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi has vowed to work towards “peace and national reconciliation” but has refused to address accusations Rohingya Muslims in her country may be the victims of crimes against humanity.

Ms Suu Kyi gave no specific details on how her government intends to resolve the violence and discrimination the long-persecuted Muslim minority face.

“We do not want our country to be unstable. But we’ve had a long history of disunity within our nation,” she said, addressing senior business representatives in Singapore.

“So national reconciliation is unavoidably important for us. It’s not a matter of choice. It’s unavoidable.”

aung-san-suu-kyi.jpg
Rohingya Muslims demonstrate outside the Burmese embassy in Kuala Lumpur (Getty)

She added: “We have to achieve peace and national reconciliation that our country may be able to progress, and that those who wish to invest in our country may find the right amount of confidence.”

Accounts of the military having gang raped, tortured and murdered members of the Rohingya community caused thousands of angry Muslims take to the streets across Asia in protest.

Around 30,000 have fled their home in Rakhines and analysis of satellite images by Human Rights Watch found hundreds of buildings in Rohingya villages have been burned.

The Burmese government has denied allegations of abuse. Officials say the army is hunting “terrorists” behind raids on police last month.

Despite having lived in Burma for generations, Rohingya Muslims are barred from citizenship in the nation of 50 million, and instead live as some of the most oppressed people in the world.

Since communal violence broke out in 2012, more than 120,000 Rohingya have been driven from their homes and crammed into squalid camps guarded by police. There, they are denied healthcare and education, and their movements are heavily restricted.

Ms Suu Kyi was scheduled to visit Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim-majority country, after Singapore, but postponed the trip in the face of public protests and a thwarted bomb plot against the Burmese embassy.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak will take part in a rare rally at the weekend to protest the crackdown on Rohingyas, an official from his office said Tuesday.

Burma’s Rohingya find work to rebuild lives

Ms Suu Kyi led her party to victory in elections last year but, barred from becoming president by a junta-era constitution, instead holds a specially created post of state counsellor.

She appointed fellow Nobel laureate former UN chief Kofi Annan to head a special commission to investigate how to mend bitter religious and ethnic divides in impoverished Rakhine.

Mr Annan began a week-long trip to Burma on Tuesday.

Additional reporting by agencies

Source by: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/aung-san-suu-kyi-burma-rohingya-muslims-crimes-against-humanity-a7447706.html

By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

Atrocities and Inhumane Tortures against Rohingya Continue

Atrocities and Inhumane Tortures against Rohingya Continue

Anwar M.S.

By Anwar M.S.November 30, 2016 18:27

Atrocities and Inhumane Tortures against Rohingya Continue

By RVision TV Correspondents | November 30, 2016

Maungdaw – The Burmese armed forces have continuously been committting mass atrocities against the Rohingya minority in Maungdaw, rapes against their women and inhumane tortures of the victims the arbitrary detentions since October 9.

It has been learnt that the Burmese military have been taking several measures to conceal their crimes as the former UN secretary General Mr. Kofi Anan is due to visit the region.

Following are the updates on the unfolding situation on the ground.

30/11/16 2 pm: Hundreds of Rohingya civilians arrested in northern Maungdaw between Nov 25 and 26 are being inhumanely tortured at Kyikanpyin BGP Headquarter.

Reportedly, many of them have been blinded as their eye-nerves have been cut off or their eyes have been gouged, says a detainee who has recently been released.

[RVision Correspondent Reports, MSRV]

30/11/16 1:30 pm: Burmese authorities have shifted all Rohingya prisoners detained arbitrarily in Buthidaung Prison (after October 9) to the nearby jungles.

Now, the victims are besieged are heavily guarded by the military in jungles. This is to the conceal crimes of the military against the Rohingya as KofiAnnan is due to visit the region.

[RVision TV Correspondent, MSRV]

30/11/16 1 pm: Since November 26, some Burmese troops have been being extra nice to some Rohingya villagers, whose homes had been burnt down, in northern Maungdaw.

The troops are asking the displaced Rohingyas to resume their daily activities and return to their places and make tents over their places instead of living outside in the field.

The locals are highly suspicious of the sudden changes in the behaviors of the military. Is it a trap to arrest more Rohingya men or because of @KofiAnnan pending visit?

[Rohingya Mirror Reports, MSRV]

30/11/16 12:30 pm: Since November 26, some Burmese troops have been being extra nice to some Rohingya villagers, whose homes had been burnt down, in northern Maungdaw.

The troops are asking the displaced Rohingyas to resume their daily activities and return to their places and make tents over their places instead of living outside in the field.

The locals are highly suspicious of the sudden changes in the behaviours of the military. Is it a trap to arrest more Rohingya men or because of KofiAnnan pending visit?

[Rohingya Mirror Reports, MSRV]

30/11/16 9 am: The group of the 46 Burmese troops that gang-raped a teenage Rohingya girl at Sinthaepyin village last night have entered the village mosque with their shoes on since this morning are now vandalizing the Mosque and tearing off the Holy Quran.

[Rohingya Mirror Reports, MSRV]

30/11/16 9 am: A Burmese Army attack helicopter continues to fly over Sinthaepyin village. The Rohingya villagers are feared of air-attacks.

[Rohingya Mirror Reports, MSRV]

30/11/16 9 am: A group of 46 Burmese troops Gang-Raped a teenage Rohingya girl at Kyun Gaung hamlet of LoneDoong VT on November 29 night.

[Rohingya Mirror Reports, MSRV]

29/11/16 6 pm: Burmese Border Guard Police arbitrarily arrested Mv Abdul Aziz Ismail, a religious scholar, from Kan Seik hamlet of Auk Pho Village tract, Kyauk Tan area, Rathedaung at 2 pm today (on November 29).

He is being detained and tortured at Nyaung Chaung BGP camp in Buthidaung.

[RVision Correspondent Reports, MSRV]

[Edited by M.S. Anwar]

Source by: http://www.rvisiontv.com/atrocities-inhumane-tortures-rohingya-continue/

By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

Myanmar Army Reported Raping Rohingya Women and Forcing Villages To Flee With Threats of Death

Myanmar Army Reported Raping Rohingya Women and Forcing Villages To Flee With Threats of Death

RB News
November 30, 2016
Maungdaw, Arakan – A group of Myanmar soldiers entered into Maung Na Ma village tract in northern Maungdaw and arbitrarily arrested several Rohingya men on false allegations, reportedly raped Rohingya women in the village and forced villagers to flee the village.
In the afternoon on November 30th 2016 the military arrived in the south hamlet of Maung Na Ma village tract, called Miszitullah hamlet. They arrested three men who were all sons of Zahir Ahmed, falsely accusing them of having swords hidden in their homes. The military then took photos of the men holding the swords, which were reportedly brought to them by Rakhine villagers from Aung Mingala  hamlet and Na Ta La (ethnic Burmese) from Aung Thar Yar hamlet.
The military was reported to have raped four women at this time, three daughters of a villager and the wife of an Imam from Maung Na Ma Gyi hamlet, according to a villager who spoke with RB News.
“Since last friday the military have been in and out of our village. They have been taking away our buffaloes, cows and other animals we have. On Saturday they arrested 16 innocent villagers. They are beating any males in the village older than 10 years old wherever they find them. If they aren’t satisfied with beating them they take them to the BGP (Border Guard police) headquarters,” the villager continued.
At 4pm the village administrator, Kyaw Kyaw Maung, was reported to have said “I can’t save all of you. You all have to leave from the village. The soldiers will come back at night and they will shoot all of you at that time.”
The villagers then gathered what belongings they could carry and left the village before sunset to find refuge in neighboring villages.
Before the villagers left some Rakhine villagers from Aung Mingalar and some Na Ta La villagers from Aung Thar Yar came holding swords and looted the town of buffaloes, cows, goats and rice paddies, according to Rohingya villagers. At this time Rohingya are left in Maung Na Ma village tract.
Another group of soldiers based in Kyun Gaung hamlet in Laung Don village tract entered Sin Thay Pyin hamlet at around 10am on the same day. They used the hamlet’s mosque as a base and were reported to have destroyed the carpeting inside and desecrated the Holy Quran by ripping pages out of it and throwing them away. Some Na Ta La villagers from Zayid Pyin were reportedly with the military when they arrived in the hamlet.
A Na Ta La villager named Lwin Moe went into the village and threatened the villagers that if all the men did not leave the soldiers would shoot them. When the soldiers came into the village the women and children had fled to a nearby village, in fear of the soldiers since they had raped many women there earlier on the 25th of November.
At 11:45AM a helicopter was spotted flying over the village a few times. The soldiers were hiding inside villages as the helicopter passed overhead. At 12PM the soldiers then stole an ox from Abdul Munaf and cook it. Other soldiers reportedly looted five goats from the streets and slaughtered and ate them as well.
While some of the soldiers were cooking the looted animals others were reported to have looted home in the village at that time. The soldiers reportedly destroyed many valuables from a villager named Ali Johar and another house. They threw his belongings into a drinking pond and destroyed the walls of his home.
Villagers said a woman from Kyun Gaung hamlet in Laung Don was gang raped during the night on November 29th, 2016.
Report contributed by MYARF.

– See more at: http://www.rohingyablogger.com/2016/11/myanmar-army-reported-raping-rohingya.html#sthash.YbTb6Pam.dpuf

By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

Press Release: Widespread rape of Rohingya women as a weapon of ethnic-cleansing

Press Release: Widespread rape of Rohingya women as a weapon of ethnic-cleansing

Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO)
Press release
30 November 2016
Widespread rape of Rohingya women as a weapon of ethnic-cleansing
On Friday 25 November, at about 5 a.m. around 500 Myanmar cruel armed forces – most of them local Buddhist Rakhine goons dressed in uniform without badge — had cordoned San They Pyin hamlet of Longdon village-tract in Maungdaw Township. About one hundred of them entered the village and seized and removed nearly 100 women and teenage girls to school field, stripped them naked under gun point and lined them up in lying position and raped. Then they made them walk along the village pathway in nude. Some of the women who defied the inhumaneness were slaughtered. The onslaught lasted until 5 p.m. But five beautiful women were not released and were sexually molested whole night by a group of savage soldiers in their camp whereupon three of them were slaughtered.
So far more than 500 innocent villagers were killed, in addition to wholesale destruction of everything by arson attacks, from dwelling houses, mosques and religious buildings to rice, paddy and food products. Terrible stench has spread in places where people could not bury the dead bodies which become food for foxes and other animals.
The local Buddhist Rakhine goons, under the instruction of their extremist leaders, are actively involved in killing, looting, raping and perpetrating other atrocity crimes side by side with the marauding soldiers.
Rape is being used as a weapon of ‘Rohingya ethnic-cleansing’. Shutting up the area to international journalists and observers facilitate the government to destroy the Rohingya people without the knowledge of the outside world, while preventing humanitarian aids has caused serious starvation to the victims of mass atrocity crimes. People are dying of shortage of food and lack of medical treatment.
We reiterate our request that the International community, UN and powerful countries, and Myanmar’s neighbours should intervene now to save the defenseless Rohingya community from total destruction.
For more details, please contact:
U.K.: Ronnie +44-7783118354
Japan: Zaw Min Htut +81-8030835327
Australia: Dr. Hla Myint +61-423381904
USA: Dr. Mohammed Habib Ullah +1-4438158609
Canada: Nur Hasim +1 (519) 572-5359
Bangladesh: Ko Ko Linn: +880-1726068413

– See more at: http://www.rohingyablogger.com/2016/11/press-release-widespread-rape-of.html#sthash.6V5BzZhr.dpuf

By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

A Genocide in the Making

A Genocide in the Making

Last fall, Burmese voters elected their first democratic government in half a century. That inspired hope that the country’s long history of violence and oppression was finally taking a turn from the better.

Now, just one year later, that promise has given way to dread. In a small pocket of western Burma, a new phase has begun in what threatens to become the genocide of the country’s Muslim Rohingya minority.

Government security forces have responded with widespread violence to a series of coordinated attacks by militant Rohingya on police outposts since October 9. The military has created a 20 kilometer-square “operation zone” barring all independent journalists from the area. Despite the restrictions, numerous reports have emerged of rapes, torture, and extrajudicial killings of Rohingya civilians by the police and army as they sweep through villages in search of militants.

The Rohingya have been refused citizenship by successive Burmese governments, who assert they are illegal Bengali immigrants. Control measures applied only to Rohingya have, for years, severely limited their access to healthcare and education. More than 120,000 already live in displacement camps following waves of violence in 2012 and 2013 in which ethnic Buddhist Rakhine razed their neighborhoods across Rakhine State.

A recent escalation in the latest violence has raised the official death toll since the October crackdown to 134, although Rohingya advocacy groups put it at more than 420. Despite Bangladesh’s refusal to take refugees, several hundred are believed to have fled to camps there. A number who crossed the Naf River separating the two countries in the middle of November were gunned down mid-river. While a number of security personnel have been killed in skirmishes, the overwhelming majority of deaths have been Rohingya. The government has claimed that all are militants, but with independent media completely barred from the region, the claims have been impossible to verify.

In recent decades, scholars of genocide have identified several likely indicators of mass killings.

In recent decades, scholars of genocide have identified several likely indicators of mass killings. Several of those signs are now clearly in evidence in western Rakhine: The systematic dehumanization of the target group; their isolation inside camps and barricaded ghettos; and violent attacks on them involving the participation of security forces. These trends have intensified in recent weeks with the amplification of a narrative that singles out the Rohingya as a menacing alien presence in Burma. The new civilian government, elected in April amid jubilation that Burma was finally charting a passage towards democratic rule, has shown a worrying tolerance toward these ominous developments — at times borderingt on outright complicity.The blanket exclusion of independent journalists from the area in recent weeks has created a black hole in which security forces can attack villages, carry out arbitrary arrests, and block the movements of Rohingya, who are unable to leave their homes to access markets or to reach medical care. Satellite imagery released by Human Rights Watch shows that 1,250 Rohingya buildings in five villages have been destroyed by recent arson attacks. The government, led by Aung San Suu Kyi, has responded by saying that the Rohingya are burning their own homes to garner international sympathy.

Presidential spokesman U Zaw Htay told journalists in late October that the government had initially deliberately blocked aid to Rohingya who had fled police and military sweeps to force them to return to their villages, where they could be investigated for possible involvement in the October attacks. This appears to be an attempt at starving them into submission, and suggests that the government believes all Rohingya to be suspects.

This latest eruption of violence fits uneasily with the optimistic narrative of a changing Burma.

This latest eruption of violence fits uneasily with the optimistic narrative of a changing Burma. In April 2016, the National League for Democracy, headed by Aung San Suu Kyi, was sworn into government. She immediately renewed efforts to broker ceasefires with warring ethnic armies in the north and east of the country, and later appointed former UN chief Kofi Annan to head an advisory commission to investigate and address human rights violations in the violence-torn Rakhine State.Despite the worsening crisis, Suu Kyi continually refuses to be drawn on the plight of the Rohingya. At best, she calls repeatedly, but vaguely, for rule of law to be respected in Rakhine State. She asked the U.S. Ambassador to Burma in May 2016 to refrain from using the word “Rohingya” lest it imply recognition of a group that the state in Burma long ago deemed to be an illegal presence in the country, and to whom it has refused citizenship and all associated state protections.

The growing volume of criticism directed at the Nobel laureate’s position mirrors the increasing dangers facing the Rohingya. Since the violence of 2012 and 2013, when Rohingya and ethnic Buddhist Rakhine attacked each other in bouts of vicious bloodletting, Rohingya have been increasingly contained inside villages, camps, and barricaded ghettos. Their 1.3-million-strong population is allowed access to only one adequately equipped hospital in the state, and is completely barred from attending higher education. The latest violence will ensure a further tightening of those restrictions, with the UN warning that 160,000 Rohingya have been without aid since October 9.

It was hoped that Suu Kyi’s government might improve conditions for the Rohingya, but recent events cast doubt on this. Demanding greater security for the maligned group would be politically costly. The ultra-nationalist Buddhist lobby in Burma has repeatedly branded the Rohingya as “terrorists” and “Islamizers,” and public opinion is pitched wholeheartedly against their being granted greater protections. Any criticism from Suu Kyi of the military’s actions in Rakhine State would be interpreted as a sign that she sympathizes with the Rohingya, and her support could fall. Accordingly, her National League for Democracy has made no attempt to rein in the hate speech. Nor has it called publicly for any control measures on the group to be removed.

Meanwhile, rhetoric from officials has grown more ominous.

Meanwhile, rhetoric from officials has grown more ominous. It has dehumanized Rohingya in precisely the ways that, as we now know, historically pave the way for mass violence against marginalized groups. The Home Affairs Minister Kyaw Swe recently described the Rohingya presence as “an invasion” of “rapid Bengali breeders,” language that cast them as animals. When Aung Win, head of a governmental commission set up to investigate the October 9 attacks, declared that “all Bengali villages are military strongholds,” he cast the group as outsiders deserving of attack. Later he told the BBC it was highly unlikely that troops had raped Rohingya women on the grounds that they “are very dirty.”State media has weighed in too. On November 26 an opinion piece in the state-run Global New Light of Myanmar newspaper warned that the country was “facing the danger of the human fleas” that “we greatly loathe for their stench and for sucking our blood.” The Nazis had used the analogy of “fleas” to describe the Jews. An earlier opinion piece on November 1 was entitled “The Thorn Needs Removing If It Pierces!” It went on to speak of “trespassers” on Burma soil, and similarly warned of the threat they allegedly pose to the country’s sovereignty. This lightly veiled call, in print, for the cleansing of the Rohingya — published without government disapproval — suggests an alignment between the civilian government, the military, and ultra-nationalist Rakhine groups that will tolerate the very worst of humanitarian excesses against the Rohingya.

By attacking the police outposts, a small fraction of the Rohingya population may have sealed the fate of the entire community. Punishment of the Rohingya has always been collective, despite the fact that collective punishment is illegal under international law. Groups tend to resort to armed conflict when institutional channels for negotiating grievances are closed off, and the decision to attack may have reflected a sense of resignation that, even in a democracy, the Rohingya would forever remain a pariah group. The response by the government and security forces — the targeting of an entire identity, rather than individuals who may have committed wrongdoing — marks a key stage in the turn to mass violence.

Today we know enough about the conditions that give rise to genocide that no one in power can justifiably claim ignorance. An understanding of these processes is assumed among all modern leaders, Aung San Suu Kyi included. The democratic mandate handed to her civilian government a year ago has resulted in that most pernicious of democratic outcomes — a tyranny of the overwhelming majority against which a small and vulnerable population is now bracing itself. Rather than providing a pathway to harmony after decades of conflict, Burma’s transition has unleashed popular hatreds that no institution in the country seems either able or willing to rein in. Suu Kyi should know that inactivity in the face of genocidal actions can carry moral, legal, and even criminal responsibility.

In the photo, a Rohingya refugee from Burma carries the body of a six-month-old boy who died in a Bangladeshi refugee camp on November 26.

Photo credit: MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images

Source by: http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/11/30/a-genocide-in-the-making-burma-myanmar-rohingya/

By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized

Statement by Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide on the situation in northern Rakhine State, Myanmar

Statement by Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide on the situation in northern Rakhine State, Myanmar

 
Note to Correspondents: Statement by Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide on the situation in northern Rakhine State, Myanmar
New York, 29 November 2016 – The United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Adama Dieng, expressed alarm at reports of the deteriorating security, human rights and humanitarian situation in northern Rakhine State, Myanmar. Following attacks by armed assailants against border security posts in October 2016, the response of the military has reportedly been characterized by excessive use of force and other serious human rights violations against civilian population, particularly the Rohingya Muslim population, including allegations of extrajudicial executions, torture, rape and the destruction of religious property. “These allegations must be verified as a matter of urgency”, stated Adama Dieng. “If they are true, the lives of thousands of people are at risk. The reputation of Myanmar, its new Government and its military forces is also at stake in this matter.”
The Special Adviser stressed that “the current restrictions on access to northern Rakhine State, which prevent verification of the allegations, are contributing to suspicion and alarm. Denying the allegations without allowing for their verification is counterproductive.” Mr. Dieng urged the Myanmar Government and the military to heed requests by the United Nations – and many others around the world – to authorise access and an immediate and thorough independent investigation into incidents reported in northern Rakhine state since October 2016. “If the allegations are found to be true, the Government must take immediate steps to stop them, prevent further violations and remedy the situation. Those found responsible for human rights violations must be punished. Failure to do so will only increase the risk of very serious international crimes that Myanmar has an obligation to prevent and punish under international law.”
Adama Dieng reminded the new Government of Myanmar of the trust placed in the Government by the international community as Myanmar transitions to democracy, noting that there have been significant steps forward in that regard. However, the Special Adviser underlined that “Myanmar needs to demonstrate its commitment to the rule of law and to the human rights of all its populations. It cannot expect that such serious allegations are ignored or go unscrutinised. Wherever and whenever these types of allegations are reported in the world, it is the duty of the international community to remind States of their responsibilities to their populations and their obligations under international law. Myanmar is no exception.”
Adama Dieng also took the opportunity to urge the Government of Bangladesh not to close its borders to refugees fleeing Myanmar. “Closing the border, deporting refugees or failing to provide assistance, exposes these populations to further violence that could, in the worst case, constitute international crimes”, the Special Adviser warned.
Adama Dieng concluded by saying that “the current violence did not come out of thin air. It is taking place against a background of very deeply rooted discrimination against specific sectors of the population and a failure to put in place conditions that would support peaceful coexistence among the different communities in Rakhine State. The Government needs, for once and for all, to find a sustainable solution to the situation of the Rohingya Muslims and other religious and ethnic minorities in Myanmar, a solution that is in full compliance with the international human rights standards that the Government has pledged to respect”.
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For media queries please contact:
Claudia Diaz, Office on Genocide Prevention and the Responsibility to Protect
Phone: +1 917-367-2061; Email: diazc@un.org

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By Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia ( MERHROM) Posted in Uncategorized