HANDING OVER OF AN URGENT MEMORANDUM TO THE UNITED NATIONS: STOP THE CONTINUOUS GENOCIDE TOWARDS PALESTINIANS AND ROHINGYAS.

source by hear,,

Michelle Gyles-McDonnough
UN Resident Coordinator for Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei
Wisma UN, Block C
Kompleks Pejabat Damansara
Jalan Dungun, Damansara Heights
50490 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia.

16 July 2014

HANDING OVER OF AN URGENT MEMORANDUM TO THE UNITED NATIONS: STOP THE CONTINUOUS GENOCIDE TOWARDS PALESTINIANS AND ROHINGYAS.

Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM) would like to draw your attention in regards to the recent attack on both Palestinians and Rohingyas by Israel and Myanmar during the beginning of the Holy month of Ramadhan. We strongly condemn such attack as many innocent people have died especially children and women. We could not accept such act as it contradicts the International Laws and International Conventions.
Both Palestinians and Rohingyas faced continuous Genocide since 1940-s. We experienced the same critical moment where we face continous attack from both regime. Unfortunately the United Nations did not take any appropriate measures to stop the long standing Genocide that cause death to thousands of Palestinians and Rohingyas.
We felt very sad and heart broken to see millions of human beings especially children, women and elderly being murdered, raped, tortured and imprisonment for the past 60 years. The United Nations, World Leaders and International Communities have constantly talks about the gross human rights violations in both countries, how Palestinians and Rohingyas were oppressed and prosecuted by the regimes. Further to that the United Nations itself announced that the Rohingya is the most prosecuted ethnic in the world. However, until now there is no concrete action taken by the United Nations to stop the oppressions, prosecutions and Genocide towards both Palestinians and Rohingyas.

The current situation is very critical. We do not know what will happen in the next few hours. The toll deaths are increasing for the Palestinians. As of now estimated 173 Palestinians have been killed and more than 1200 Palestinians have been wounded badly. We have to stop this immediately to save the innocent population. We have to increase pressure to stop the Genocide in both countries.

Therefore:-

We strongly condemned Israel and Myanmar for attacking innocent populations, Mosques, hospitals, schools, and Madrasah for whatever reasons due to the facts that these are the noble places.

We strongly condemned Israel for using boms that can cause cancer to the Palestinians. Such attack towards innocent population could not be accepted at all as children and women will be suffering the most.

We strongly condemn Israel for destroying the water supply for the Palestinians as water is a very basic need to the human survivals.

We strongly condemn all Alliance countries to Israel for supplying military equipments to kill the Palestinians

We strongly condemn the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) for not doing enough to protect the Holy place of all Religions – Baitul Maqdis.

Few hundred thousands have died both in Palestin and Arakan State due to bombings, shooting, diseases, malnutrition and starvations. Thousands more of Rohingya drowned in the ocean over the years while fleeing their country.

We regret very much when the United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon appealed for a ceasefire between Israel and Palestinian. This clearly shows that United Nations losing its mandate to secure the security of its member states.
We have everything in the world to save us from the GENOCIDE but it was not use to help us. We have the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) as a super solid declaration which guides us how we suppose to live in this world. The UDHR clearly state our rights in very detail way. Unfortunately in our cases, NONE of these RIGHTS are belong to us. It is shameful that we only can see the UDHR in a paper but we cannot embrace it in our life. All our rights have been taken away by the regimes.

WE have the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) but none of their rights are guarenteed in Palestin and Myanmar. Ironicly children and women became the target by both regimes and suffered the most at any times.

We have the International Criminal Court (ICC) to prosecute those who involved in the Crimes Against Humanity but it was not use to prosecute the head of the countries who conducted the GENOCIDE against Palestinians and Rohingya.

We have the United Nations Security Council who oversees the security issues around the world but it was not use to secure the Palestinians and Rohingyas while we become the victims of GENOCIDE. We had urged the United Nations thousand times to take immediate actions to intervene but it was not done except sending their envoys and making reports.

As a Mandated Body, the United Nations must treat all race and ethnic equally without being prejudice to their religion. If not United Nations cannot functions effectively and it will lose its credibility as a Mandated body.

Human rights and International Conventions are useless if these Instruments could not stop Genocide and other form of crimes against humanity. We should not call ourself as Civilize nation until we respect each other’s rights.

We have no more time to talk and negotiate with the regimes. This is the time to take action against the regimes who commit severe crimes against humanity. The failure of the United Nations to stop the GENOCIDE is the failure of the World Leaders and the International Communities at large.

Human lives must be given the first priority before anything else if we call ourselves as a develop nations. We must contribute in whatever way to save the Palestinians and Rohingyas from the continuous Genocide from the cruel and uncivilize regime.
Israel is an illegal state who committed the biggest crime against humanity – GENOCIDE for the past 60 years. All countries should not condone with Israel’s crimes against Palestinians.

In this very critical situation, MERHROM urge the United Nations to:

1. immediately send the Peace Keeping Mission to Gaza to restore ceasefire and monitor the human rights abuses

2. urge Israel to allows foreign aid and aid workers to enter Gaza without any restrictions

3. urge the Alliance countries to Israel to stop military and financial assistance to Israel immediately in order to stop the killing of Palestinians

4. urge its member states to boikot all Israel product as well as the products of Israel Alliance Countries until the Israel stop killing the Palestinians

5. urge the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to immediately stop exporting oil to Aliance Countries to Israel until Israel stop killing the Palestinians

6. urge all countries to immediately stop the economic and diplomatic relationship with Israel immediately until they stop the attack on Gaza and Palestinians

7. urge Israel to free Palestinians prisoners

8. prosecute the current and former Prime Minister of Israel for Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity. They must be brought to the International Criminal Court (ICC) for killing the Palestinians

 

 

 
For the plight of Rohingyas in Myanmar, MERHROM urge the United Nations to:

1. Prosecute the President Thien Sein and former General Thein Shwe as well as previous Generals for Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity. They must be brought to the International Criminal Court (ICC) for killing, raping, torturing, detaining and abusing Minority Muslims and other ethnics.

2. Urge the Myanmar government to amend the 1982 Citizenship Law to recognize Rohingya as a citizen of Myanmar.

3. urge its member states to stop the economic and political relationship with Myanmar immediately until they protect Rohingya and Muslims in Myanmar with equal rights.

4. establish an Independent Commission of Inquiry Immediately to specifically investigate the gross human rights violations towards Rohingya prisoners in Buthidaung jail.

5. Urge the United Nations Security Council to send their Peace Keeping Mission to Arakan State Urgently to control and monitor the human rights abuses.

6. establish an Independent Commission of Inquiry Immediately to investigate, monitor and access the situation of Rohingya in Arakan State.

7. Urge the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Malaysia (UNHCR) to speed their registration process for the Rohingya asylum seekers. At the moment the registration process is very slow and it will only left the Rohingya with no protection at all.

8. Urge the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Malaysia (UNHCR) to process the Resettlement of Rohingya refugees to the Third Countries due to increase persecutions by the Myanmar Government towards minority Rohingya.

 

9. Urge the Resettlement countries to accept Rohingya refugees due to very low intake of Rohingya refugees into their countries. At this critical stage we appeal the Resettlement Countries to accept the victims of GENOCIDE and give us the new life for our future generations.

We thank you very much for your Urgent Intervention to resolve the conflict and Save the Palestinians and Rohingyas from the GENOCIDE.
Thank you.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

 

Mr. Zafar Ahmad Bin Abdul Ghani
President
Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM)
Tel No: +6016-6827287
Blog: http://www.merhrom.wordpress.com
Email: rights4rohingya@yahoo.co.uk
Email: rights4rohingyas@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/zafar.ahmad

https://twitter.com/merhromZafar

U.S. wanted Burma to model democratic change, but it’s not turning out that way

source by : http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/us-wanted-burma-to-model-democratic-change-but-its-not-turning-out-that-way/2014/07/06/78321986-367b-4422-a896-69342e8874ac_story.html

By Annie Gowen and David Nakamura July 6

Women and children wait for medical care at the makeshift Aung clinic, which serves many Rohingya Muslims with a few staff giving free medical care. (Paula Bronstein/for The Washington Post)

RANGOON, Burma — President Obama recently singled out Burma as a U.S. foreign policy victory — a country that had emerged from decades of military rule and turned toward the West, thanks in part to American diplomacy.

If Burma succeeds, the president told West Point cadets recently, “we will have gained a new partner without having fired a shot.” But two years after Obama made a historic visit to the Southeast Asian nation, the achievement is in jeopardy.

Burma’s government has cracked down on the media. The parliament is considering laws that could restrict religious freedom. And revered opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who welcomed Obama to her home in 2012, remains constitutionally barred from running for president as the country heads into a pivotal election next year.

The situation is most dire in Burma’s western reaches, where more than 100,000 Rohingya Muslims are living as virtual prisoners, with little access to health care and food. The fast-deteriorating conditions prompted Tomás Ojéa Quintana, a former United Nations special rapporteur for human rights, to say in April that there is an “element of genocide” in the Rohingyas’ plight.

The setbacks have raised the stakes for Obama’s scheduled November visit to a regional conference in Burma, during which the administration had hoped to showcase the country’s progress as part of its strategic “rebalance” toward Asia. Now even some of Obama’s allies on Capitol Hill have begun to question whether the administration has moved too quickly to embrace Burma’s leadership.

“We have a moral obligation despite the political benefits” of improving ties, said Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.), who has introduced a bill to link additional U.S. aid to human rights reforms. “We’re for having a relationship with Burma, but only if they respect human rights and the rule of law.”

A woman holds her son as she waits for rations of rice from the U.N. World Food Program. (Paula Bronstein/for The Washington Post)

To be sure, Burma is no longer the dictatorship it was five years ago, when it allowed no free elections or public dissent. The government has conditionally released hundreds of political prisoners, abolished censorship and permitted a democratically elected parliament. The president’s spokesman, Ye Htut, said critics are not giving the country enough credit for what it has done.

U.S. officials said Obama will make clear to President Thein Sein that his government must address the human rights issues and allow a truly democratic election in 2015 if it expects to maintain good relations with the United States.

“As far as Burma’s come in the last three years, they’re getting to the really hard stuff now,” said Tom Malinowski, assistant secretary of state for democracy, human rights and labor. “That’s why there are some acute problems and legitimate fears about prospects for full success.”
A change in attitude

Burma, also known as Myanmar, sits in a strategic location between China and India. From 1962 onward, it was ruled by secretive, brutal military regimes. The United States imposed stiff economic sanctions after the Burmese military killed thousands during a student uprising in 1988.

But by 2010, the Obama administration began to see signs that Burma’s generals were looking to open up the country and move away from their close ties with China and North Korea. The generals released Suu Kyi — who had won the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize for her pro-democracy struggle — from house arrest.

By 2011, “the prospects for progress were better than at any time in a generation,” former secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton wrote in her recent memoir, “Hard Choices,” which devotes a chapter to Burma. She wrote that “those early days of flickering progress and uncertain hope remain a high point of my time as Secretary.”

The State Department began a policy of matching “action for action,” rewarding the Burmese government’s reforms with a gradual easing of sanctions.

Clinton went to Burma in 2011. The following year, Suu Kyi was elected to parliament, and Obama became the first sitting U.S. president to visit.

Since then, Burma has changed rapidly. For decades the country retained the aura of a fading colonial outpost, with crumbling buildings and few Western goods available. Now in Rangoon, the country’s commercial capital that is also known as Yangon, construction cranes compete for attention on the skyline with the historic gold Shwedagon Pagoda. Restaurants serving Australian tenderloin and sushi are opening, as are Mercedes and Jaguar dealerships.

A monk holds a begging bowl next to a large construction site. (Paula Bronstein/for The Washington Post)
Commuters head home from work by bus. (Paula Bronstein/for The Washington Post)

The country of more than 55 million people remains one of the poorest in the world. Chinese investment far outpaces that of the United States — about $14 billion compared with about $243 million. Western companies have been slow to arrive because of infrastructure problems and a lack of qualified workers.

Military’s grip endures

Despite the political opening, the Burmese military still holds extraordinary power under a constitution that guarantees the armed forces a quarter of the seats in parliament and reserves key ministry posts for officers.

Burmese and foreign human rights activists worry that the government has slowed or even reversed its progress toward democracy.

In his 2012 meeting with Obama, Thein Sein made 11 commitments to implement additional democratic reforms and human rights protections. But activists and U.S. congressional leaders say his government has delivered on few of them.

For example, the Burmese president pledged to reach a cease-fire in predominantly Christian Kachin state, one of several areas of this majority-Buddhist country where armed ethnic groups have long clashed with the military.

Since a cease-fire in the state fell apart three years ago, the Burmese military has burned churches and destroyed villages, activists say. The human rights group Fortify Rights recently alleged that the military has tortured more than 60 civilians there in the past three years. The government has denied the torture allegations.

Meanwhile, the country’s political situation has become complicated by the rise of a movement of extreme Buddhist nationalists, who are freer to operate in the less repressive environment.

Nationalist monks seeking to protect their religion from the spread of Islam are pushing for laws that would block interfaith marriage and make it more difficult for people to convert. The monks — backed by a petition signed by thousands of citizens — want non-Buddhist men to convert before marrying Buddhist women or face 10 years in prison. The laws are being drafted in parliament with the support of the government, according to Ye Htut.

Then there is the matter of the Rohingya, a long-persecuted Muslim minority who are not considered citizens although many have lived in the country for generations. In 2012, thousands of Ro­hingya were displaced after their villages were torched by Buddhists angry that Muslim men had allegedly raped a Buddhist woman.

Rohingya girls pump drinking water at the Dar Paing camp outside Sittwe. (Paula Bronstein/for The Washington Post)
Aye Aye sits in the middle of a road selling shrimp at a local market to help her family outside Rangoon. (Paula Bronstein/for The Washington Post)

Two years later, more than 100,000 Rohingya live in overcrowded camps. Health conditions worsened recently after the government suspended Doctors Without Borders and other aid groups following two more rounds of violence, although some humanitarian workers have begun returning.

Ye Htut said that long-running peace talks continue with ethnic militias, including those in Kachin state, and that the government is trying to ease tensions between Rohingya Muslims and Buddhists.

He said Washington should show more appreciation for Burma’s reforms, which include opening up the government-dominated economy and allowing private newspapers to operate.

“Some people in Congress have tried to shift the goal posts again and again instead of recognizing our progress,” Ye Htut said.

Still, the fragility of the reforms has been underlined in recent months as authorities arrested several local reporters on what rights groups call politically motivated charges that include defamation and revealing state secrets. The government has also instituted tighter press registration laws.

“There are a lot of people in Washington who think there is this great success story” in Burma, said David S. Mathieson, senior researcher on Burma for Human Rights Watch. “But there are a lot of indicators that they’re heading south very quickly.”

Obama plans to raise concerns about the Rohingya and the government’s unfulfilled promises when he visits Burma, a White House official said.

“When we talk about our democratization agenda in Asia, Burma is example number one,” the official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of diplomatic sensitivities. “It’s a big play, but it’s a risky play. We know that. And that’s why we are continuing to invest in our relationship.”

Political activism

Suu Kyi’s party launched a petition drive to remove a part of the constitution that gives the military veto power over constitutional changes that could open the door to broader reforms.

On a sweltering day in downtown Rangoon, volunteers sat outside the party’s headquarters collecting signatures, an activity that would have been unheard of in the days of the military junta.

In the impoverished Hliang Thaya area outside Rangoon, home to many factory workers, people sign a petition organized by Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy to allow constitutional changes. (Paula Bronstein/for The Washington Post)

Music praising Suu Kyi blasted from loudspeakers. Nobody seemed to be afraid of speaking out, although one man who was wearing a pro-democracy ­T-shirt asked that he not be photographed.

One democracy campaigner, Zin Mar Aung, said she and other activists were harassed with anonymous text messages and death threats after they criticized the proposed interfaith-marriage law. She worries that the petition drive won’t work because the military does not want to fully give up power.

“We think their reforms have stagnated,” she said. “We think liberalization is over and the regime doesn’t want to give power through democratic elections.”

1 of 34
More than three years after Burma began its transition from a military dictatorship, ethnic tensions and repressive policies threaten the development of democracy.
Women and children wait in line for medical care at the makeshift Aung clinic in Sittwe. Many clients of the understaffed clinic are Rohingya, a long-persecuted Muslim minority. Paula Bronstein/For The Washington Post

Nakamura reported from Washington.
Khine Thurein in Rangoon contributed
to this report.

MANDALAY RIOT: GENOCIDE CONTINUES IN THE HOLY MONTH OF RAMADHAN.

hear source by ;
PRESS STATEMENT

6th JULY 2014

Dear Chief Editors,

MANDALAY RIOT: GENOCIDE CONTINUES IN THE HOLY MONTH OF RAMADHAN.

Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM) is deeply concerned about the recent riot in Mandalay that claims two lives and wounded 14 others to date. We are very sad that the riot took place when the Muslim all over the world just started fasting in the Holy month of Ramadhan. The accusation by the Buddhist mobs that a Buddhist women was raped by the Muslim man have no basis at all. Until now they could not prove that the Muslim man rape the Buddhist women. The accusation is not logical at all as the whole world is aware that the Muslims in Myanmar were oppressed and prosecuted very much by the government. The Muslims in Myanmar are defenceless, hopeless and stateless, how can we do that especially in the Holy month of Ramadhan. We do not have any rights in our own country, we do not have any freedom to do anything, and we are not in the position to commit any crime. How could we rape a Buddhist woman in a prominent Buddhist country?

The information received by MERHROM from Mandalay reveals that the police, monks and Buddhist mobs have roaming the Muslims area in Mandalay for 3 days before the riot. We strongly believe that this is a continuous plan by the Myanmar government to eliminate Muslims from Myanmar. The Genocide continues even in the Holy month of Ramadhan. The statement made by the Buddhist extremists stating that they wants to kill all Muslims in Myanmar are in line with the Myanmar government policy to eliminate Muslims from Myanmar.

Currently the government has imposed a curfew in Mandalay but the curfew is only for Muslims. The curfew was imposed to control the Muslims and to restrict the Muslim from moving from other places so that the can target the Muslims easily. The curfew was not applicable for Buddhist and the rest of population.

In this Holy month of Ramadan we were expecting a peaceful fasting. However the Muslims in Myanmar going through the holy Ramadhan in the blood, starvation and oppressions. There is no food for morning breakfast and break fasting. Many children died due to starvation, no shelter and medication. MEHROM feel very sad when this happening in the Holy month of Ramadhan. The Muslim Rohingyas cannot perform Ramadhan prayers and other religious duties. Many mosques has been burnt down and lots of the remaining mosques especially in the Arakan State has been lock to by the Myanmar government to stop the Muslims to conduct religious duties.

Back in 2012, the Myanmar government using the same reason to attack the Muslims in Arakan State. The reason is also rape but there is no evidence to prove the Muslim men committed the raped. The court process was closed to public. Finally the suspects who are three Muslim men were imprisonment. The Myanmar government always creating a reason in order to attack Muslim minority in Myanmar.

We condemned the arrest of the five Muslim leaders including the Imam of the Mosque as they have not committed any crimes. The government cannot continue to arrest anyone with suspicion. We do not know how many more Muslims they will kill and arrest. The current situation is very worrying for the Muslims as they have no protection from the authority. The Muslims were surrounded by the Buddhist mobs with knives and arms. Anytime they can be attacked.We cannot hope for the Myanmar government to stop the riot as they are behind it.

All World Leaders praising the Myanmar government for the Investment Opportunities. Why United Nations and the World Leaders play game on our lives? Do you think we are not human enough to be saved? Is it because we are Muslim, we are not deserve to be saved? We are dying day by day but the United Nations and World Leaders are busy talking about their investments with Myanmar government. We are dying in front of you but you are only looking and talking without taking real action to stop the biggest crimes against humanity – GENOCIDE.

The United Nations has sent an envoy to visits Arakan State as well as Meikhtila for many times. The envoys are the witness to the real conditions of Rohingya and Muslims in Myanmar. They already look at the impact of this violence on Rohingya. Then, what stopping the United Nations from taking further actions? Do you think our suffering does not enough for you to take further actions? What is the most Mandated body is waiting for while we are dying day by day under the cruel government.

We have everything in the world to save us from the GENOCIDE but it was not use to help us. We have the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) as a super solid declaration which guides us how we suppose to live in this world. The UDHR clearly state our rights in very detail way. Unfortunately in our case, NONE of these RIGHTS are belong to us. It is shameful that we only can see the UDHR in a paper but we cannot practice it in our life. All our rights have been taken away by our own government.

Therefore we Urge the United Nations, World Leaders, OIC and ASEAN to intervene to save the remaining Muslims and We condemmed those who silent about the GENOCIDE in Myanmar.

Thank you.

Yours sincerely,

Mr. Zafar Ahmad Bin Abdul Ghani
President
Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM)
Tel No: +6016-6827287
Blog: http://www.merhrom.wordpress.com
Email: rights4rohingya@yahoo.co.uk
Email: rights4rohingyas@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/zafar.ahmad.

https://twitter.com/merhromZafar

Breaking News – Leaked news of Burmese Buddhist extremist: Terrible Bloodshed might happen in Manaday

source by http://burmatimes.net/breaking-news/

Breaking News – Leaked news of Burmese Buddhist extremist: Terrible Bloodshed might happen in Manaday
Posted by admin
Burma Times: 04 July 2014

Burma Times: It is reliably learnt from an internal source of Naypyidaw government (central administration) that on 4th July, tonight ( Friday night which will turn to Saturday morning, ) the most terrible violence might happen which will be triggered aiming at leading bloodshed against Muslim. The Buddhist radicals, ultra-nationalist, radical monks well prepared to take revenge for the 36-year-old Buddhist man U Tun Tun who was killed in the violence happened since July 1.

Police have taken all knives and swords away from Muslims. However, government is blind to weapons kept in monasteries to be used in violence.

Muslims at Mandalay region are at full of fear and worrying as armed forces only watch immobile to mob attack without taking any action against them.

The notorious monk Wirathu, leader of anti-Muslim movement 969, already convinced tens of thousands of thugs including prostitutes to trigger terrible violence against Muslims. He, monk Wirathu delivered a secret sermon in his Masoyein monastery that “we are out of fear because we are doing our best to protect our religion Buddhism and current government, and no need to be worried for administration which is with us. Kill Muslims as much as you can as the properties of dead Muslims will be possessed by our monasteries”, disclosed by a white-hearted Buddhist Mandalian who wanted to stay with peaceful co-existence between Buddhist and Muslim.

The Rohingya Student Union told to Burma Times, following the above leaked news of Burmese Buddhist Extremist that the most terrible violence might occur in Mandalay, the Rohingya Student Union demand Burmese government for a quick- stop to such state-sponsored Islamophobia as soon as possible, to deploy experienced armies throughout the Mandalay division, to appoint new minister for Mandalay division as the current one is not eager to stop the Buddhist mob who attack innocent Muslims, to seek who is the behind of the root cause of violence, to prosecute against the key perpetrator of violence monk Wirathu and to ensure the life security of minority Muslim Mandalians.

If international community does not pressurize President Thein Sein to refrain from creating such continual unrest which badly affect to Muslims rather than Buddhists, we the Muslims will not be able to survive further, some Muslim shopkeepers from Mandalay told to Burma Times.

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The Rohingya Daily

source by : http://paper.li/JamilaHanan/1345127607

David Ward MP organises Parliamentary debate on persecution of Rohingya & minorities in Burma (David Ward MP)

Shared by
Merle A. Jacobs,PhD

davidward.org.uk – David Ward, MP for Bradford East, has arranged a Parliamentary debate on the persecution of the Rohingya people and other minorities in Burma for Wednesday 25th June. The Westminster Hall debate on…

Myanmar: Burma’s Rohingya Left to Die in Concentration Camps – TIME

Shared by
Abbie

time.com – Several days before he was born, Mohammad Johar’s family escaped the Buddhist mobs that attacked their Muslim neighborhood, leaving bodies and burned homes in their wake. The threat of renewed viol…

Rohingyas screened to assess citizenship claims

Shared by
Abbie

dvb.no – A programme to register stateless Muslim IDPs is continuing at Myebon camp in Arakan State. The project invites those born before 1982, around 700 out of the camp population of 3,000, to prove that…

Rohingya Blogger: From Myanmar to Malaysia, Rohingya Hussain Ahmad’s incredible trek to peace

Shared by
Raimo Kangasniemi

rohingyablogger.com – Rohingya Muslims gather together at a traditional wrestling festival at Kyaukpannu village in Maungdaw, Myanmar, June 6, 2014. (Photo: Reuters) CHERAS, Malaysia — Six years ago, Rohingya refugee Hu…

An Open Letter To The Burmese

Shared by
meltemarikan

burmatimes.net – Muslims, who make up some 15% of the population of Myanmar, are a blessing and bounty for the state. As the moral values of the Qur’an require, these Muslim brothers of ours possess great virtues, …

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Editor’s note

I’ve not curated any of these articles, they are just pulled in automatically. Thought it might help you see at a glance new stories on the Rohingya. There’s actually a lot being written about them (just not so much from the main stream news outlets). It might happen that some propaganda against the Rohingya slips in here from time to time, so read with discernment.

“I’d Kill Him” – Racist Violence as State Policy in Burma 

Shared by
Eliza

huffingtonpost.com – In some areas of remote Rakhine State in western Burma (officially the Union of Myanmar), mothers struggle to find medicine for their sick children, people avoid visiting clinics for fear of violen…

Rohingya Blogger: The spectre of ethnic violence reappears

Shared by
Voice of Rohingya

rohingyablogger.com – In the light of a recent series of bills proposed by the Myanmar government that seek to restrict an individual’s right to religious freedom, critics fear a further increase in discrimination and v…

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EenVandaag :: De kampen van de Rohingya

Shared by
Mohammed

eenvandaag.nl – De Rohingya, een islamitische etnische minderheid die vooral in Birma leven. Ze zijn niet welkom in Bangladesh en worden verketterd door de overwegend boeddhistische bevolking van Myanmar. Ondertus…

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Rohingya Blogger: Changing Dynamics in Myanmar Impact Bangladesh’s Geopolitics

Shared by
Rohingya Blogger

rohingyablogger.com – Image Credit: Bangladesh via Shutterstock.com Myanmar’s opening to democracy and investment are changing Bangladesh’s economic and security strategy. On May 28, as the latest skirmish unfolded betw…

All Business →

The Rohingya Daily

source by : http://paper.li/JamilaHanan/1345127607

The Rohingya Daily

Shared by
Merle A. Jacobs,PhD

davidward.org.uk – David Ward, MP for Bradford East, has arranged a Parliamentary debate on the persecution of the Rohingya people and other minorities in Burma for Wednesday 25th June. The Westminster Hall debate on…

Myanmar: Burma’s Rohingya Left to Die in Concentration Camps – TIME

Shared by
Abbie

time.com – Several days before he was born, Mohammad Johar’s family escaped the Buddhist mobs that attacked their Muslim neighborhood, leaving bodies and burned homes in their wake. The threat of renewed viol…

Rohingyas screened to assess citizenship claims

Shared by
Abbie

dvb.no – A programme to register stateless Muslim IDPs is continuing at Myebon camp in Arakan State. The project invites those born before 1982, around 700 out of the camp population of 3,000, to prove that…

Rohingya Blogger: From Myanmar to Malaysia, Rohingya Hussain Ahmad’s incredible trek to peace

Shared by
Raimo Kangasniemi

rohingyablogger.com – Rohingya Muslims gather together at a traditional wrestling festival at Kyaukpannu village in Maungdaw, Myanmar, June 6, 2014. (Photo: Reuters) CHERAS, Malaysia — Six years ago, Rohingya refugee Hu…

An Open Letter To The Burmese

Shared by
meltemarikan

burmatimes.net – Muslims, who make up some 15% of the population of Myanmar, are a blessing and bounty for the state. As the moral values of the Qur’an require, these Muslim brothers of ours possess great virtues, …

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Editor’s note

I’ve not curated any of these articles, they are just pulled in automatically. Thought it might help you see at a glance new stories on the Rohingya. There’s actually a lot being written about them (just not so much from the main stream news outlets). It might happen that some propaganda against the Rohingya slips in here from time to time, so read with discernment.

“I’d Kill Him” – Racist Violence as State Policy in Burma 

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Eliza

huffingtonpost.com – In some areas of remote Rakhine State in western Burma (officially the Union of Myanmar), mothers struggle to find medicine for their sick children, people avoid visiting clinics for fear of violen…

Rohingya Blogger: The spectre of ethnic violence reappears

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Voice of Rohingya

rohingyablogger.com – In the light of a recent series of bills proposed by the Myanmar government that seek to restrict an individual’s right to religious freedom, critics fear a further increase in discrimination and v…

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EenVandaag :: De kampen van de Rohingya

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Mohammed

eenvandaag.nl – De Rohingya, een islamitische etnische minderheid die vooral in Birma leven. Ze zijn niet welkom in Bangladesh en worden verketterd door de overwegend boeddhistische bevolking van Myanmar. Ondertus…

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Rohingya Blogger: Changing Dynamics in Myanmar Impact Bangladesh’s Geopolitics

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Rohingya Blogger

rohingyablogger.com – Image Credit: Bangladesh via Shutterstock.com Myanmar’s opening to democracy and investment are changing Bangladesh’s economic and security strategy. On May 28, as the latest skirmish unfolded betw…

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These Aren’t Refugee Camps, They’re Concentration Camps, and People Are Dying in Them

source by : http://time.com/2888864/rohingya-myanmar-burma-camps-sittwe/

These Aren’t Refugee Camps, They’re Concentration Camps, and People Are Dying in Them

Rohingya Refugees Face Health Crisis As Myanmar
Rosheda Bagoung holds her malnourished child inside the tent at the Dar Paing refugee camp in Sittwe, Burma, on May 10, 2014 Lam Yik Fei—Getty Images

Confined to squalid camps, supposedly for their own “protection,” Burma’s persecuted Rohingya are slowly succumbing to starvation, despair and disease. Some are calling it a crime against humanity

Several days before he was born, Mohammad Johar’s family escaped the Buddhist mobs that attacked their Muslim neighborhood, leaving bodies and burned homes in their wake. The threat of renewed violence has since kept the family and tens of thousands of fellow ethnic Rohingya confined to a wasteland of camps, ringed by armed guards, outside this coastal town in western Burma. But enforced confinement has spawned more insidious dangers. Last week, 2-year-old Mohammad Johar died of diarrhea and other complications, contracted in a camp that state authorities claim was made to safeguard him. The local medical clinic was empty and the nearest hospital too far — perhaps impossible to reach, given that his family would have to secure permission to go outside the wire. “Only in death will he be free,” sighed his 18-year-old brother, Nabih, moments after wrapping the toddler’s body in a cotton shroud.

Two years after the outbreak of communal violence, a deepening humanitarian crisis is claiming more lives by the day. Malnutrition and waterborne illnesses in the camps, aggravated by the eviction of aid groups and onset of monsoon rains, have led to a surge of deaths that are easily preventable. In a country that’s still being hailed in the West for its tilt toward democracy, the ongoing blockade on critical aid to more than 100,000 displaced Rohingya around Sittwe — and thousands elsewhere in Rakhine state — amounts to a crime against humanity, rights groups say.

For years, the Rohingya have been denied citizenship in Buddhist-majority Burma, and have faced severe restrictions on marriage, employment, health care and education. Now, it seems, the Burmese authorities are determined to starve and sicken the Rohingya out of existence.

“Aid is still being obstructed by the authorities in a variety of ways, and this appears to be symptomatic of the shared feeling among government officials at all levels that the Rohingya don’t belong in Rakhine state,” says Matthew Smith, executive director of Fortify Rights, a Bangkok-based group that released a February report highlighting long-standing government policies targeting the ethnic minority. “The increasingly permanent segregation of the Rohingya is wholly inconsistent with the dominant narrative that democracy is sweeping the nation. The Rohingya are facing something greater than persecution — they’re facing existential threats.”

The vice grip shows no signs of loosening. Construction is now under way for a sprawling, walled-off police base inside the camp’s perimeter. Doctors Without Borders, the international aid agency that was evicted by the government in February, has not been allowed back. Although some foreign aid groups have resumed operations since late March, when radical Buddhists ransacked more than a dozen offices, the U.N. says much more should be done. The World Food Programme continues to provide rations of rice, chickpeas, oil and salt, but aid workers insist they are not enough to stem the gathering problem of acute malnutrition. Indeed, several interned Rohingya tell TIME they were brutally beaten by Burmese security forces in recent weeks for attempting to supplement their diet by fishing beyond the boundaries of the camps.

Burma’s government refuses to recognize its 1.3 million Rohingya as citizens. Though Rohingya have lived in the Buddhist-majority country for generations, they are widely, and affectedly, referred to as Bengalis, to convey the false impression that they are intruders from neighboring Bangladesh. “There is no such thing as ‘Rohingya,’” insists U Pynya Sa Mi, the head of a monastery in Sittwe. “The Rakhine people are simply defending their land against immigrants who are creating problems.”

Burmese officials downplay the health crisis, noting provisions of water and medical services. But the misery in the camps tells another story. Just off the road that leads inside, naked children with extended bellies loiter near a makeshift clinic that serves hundreds of families living in tarp-and-sheet-metal barracks. A line of mothers awaits the attention of Chit San Win, a former nurse who, out of necessity, has become a mobile doctor to the displaced. He sees an average of 40 patients a day and says conditions have become “much worse” since Doctors Without Borders was ousted, citing the dearth of government services and supplies. A 1-year-old boy under his care coughs with symptoms of tuberculosis, a growing scourge due to a lack of vaccinations. HIV and malaria are also a concern. However, without a lab to run tests or international aid agencies to provide hospital referrals, he’s left giving out hopeful assurances and second-rate medicine. “I do what I can,” says Chit San Win.

While the death toll is not clear because of the restrictions against aid groups, desperate conditions have driven scores of Rohingya to risk their lives at sea on boats bound for Thailand and Malaysia. Originally, traffickers packed dozens of refugees onto rickety craft that often sank. These days, the smaller boats ferry travelers to larger vessels that come up from the Burma-Thailand border; once full, with 300 to 500 passengers, they set off on the three-day voyage to Thailand. On arrival, the Rohingya must pay $2,000 to traffickers who brought them. If they fail to pay up, they may be imprisoned in jungle camps for ransom or sold into debt bondage. Those caught by the authorities hardly fare better: the Thais corral them in grim detention centers, where they fester as officials wait for a third country to take them.

Abul Bassier, a 36-year-old schoolteacher whose brother and father were killed when a mob razed their home in Sittwe’s Bu May quarter, says his younger brother took his chances on a boat trip in March. About two weeks later, Abul Bassier received a phone call from a man in Thailand demanding money for his brother’s release. With six children of his own to look after and no freedom to work, he is overcome by his own helplessness. “What can I do here, a prisoner with no rights, no humanity?” he exclaims, breaking into tears. Each time Abul Bassier calls the number stored on his cell phone, he says a Thai man asks whether he has the money, then hangs up when the invariably negative answer is given.

And yet, with scant relief on the horizon, some Rohingya are still mustering everything they can to get out, selling their own food rations, scrap metal, even their own clothing to raise funds. One of them, Muhibullah, 54, says he made the journey overland to Malaysia in 1988, back when the ruling military junta had all but sealed off Burma from the world. He was caught and spent 18 months in prison in Malaysia before being deported home. Over the past year, he says five of his friends have made the boat trip successfully; three have died en route. “But I’m not afraid,” he says, getting nods of support from a group of hard-bitten men seated with him under the shade of a banyan tree, waiting.

An hour later, the funeral procession for Mohammad Johar glides by and the men’s conversation falls silent. Trailed by a gaggle of boys in knitted white caps, a volunteer carries the tiny blanketed corpse on a banana leaf, far past the sun-beaten barracks and empty government-built health clinic. The group finally stops at a grass clearing in earshot of the sea, where lines of bamboo pens mark the freshly dug graves. In short order the little boy is buried and a prayer offered. Another day, another life gone.

This story was reported with a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Rohingya in Malaysia: Between a rock and a hard place Read more at: http://english.astroawani.com/news/show/rohingya-in-malaysia-between-a-rock-and-a-hard-place-35991?cp

source by : http://english.astroawani.com/news/show/rohingya-in-malaysia-between-a-rock-and-a-hard-place-35991
 

Rohingya in Malaysia: Between a rock and a hard place

Rohingya in Malaysia: Between a rock and a hard place

The stateless Rohingya flee their homes to escape ethnic persecution in Myanmar; but reach Malaysia & remain stateless in their new homes.
‘We are already victims. Don’t make us victims twice.’ Such is the simple plea of Zafar Ahmead Mohd Abdul Ghani for the thousands of Rohingya seeking refuge here in Malaysia.

Zafar himself is Rohingya, a Muslim ethnic minority from the Rakhine state in western Myanmar who have been subjected to ethnic and religious persecution in the predominantly Buddhist country for years.

The Rohingya are unrecognised as citizens by their government, and are considered ‘stateless’ immigrants in their own country although they claim to have lived there for centuries.

Many of the dark-skinned people of Bengali descent say that they are not allowed to practice their own culture, religion or even speak their own language. Hundreds have been killed, and their villages burnt allegedly by the military and police.

Such systematic persecution or “ethnic cleansing” as some call it, has led hundreds of thousands to flee their homeland to seek asylum and safety. They leave in dangerous boats – risking drowning on high seas and enduring days of starvation and sickness – with hopes to get to any land that will offer refuge.

Many have ended up in Bangladesh, others in Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, and India. Some even made it as far as Australia.

Being Rohingya in Malaysia

In Malaysia, the Rohingya have been seeking refuge since the 80s, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) stating that there are 36,290 of them here (as of April 2014). There are perhaps a few thousand more unaccounted for.

Astro AWANI recently visited some of them living in the capital, Kuala Lumpur, and found that life as a Rohingya refugee in Malaysia is not at all easy.

“It didn’t matter where (we went then), as long as we lived,” says Zafar, who arrived in Malaysia as ‘boat people’ 22 years ago.

For Zafar and majority of the asylum seekers who made the perilous journey to flee from being killed and tortured in the own country; they only fall victim to human trafficking, migrant exploitation and abuses in another country.

In effect, they are caught between a rock and a hard place: stateless back home and stateless in their new homes.

Living and working in fear

Malaysia is not a signatory to the 1951 UN Refugees Convention. As such, there are no legal mechanisms in place to give any status to refugees. Although the Malaysian government has gradually softened its stance through the years, they are vulnerable to constant harassment and detention.

“I was arrested 14 times (in Malaysia I can tell you exactly what goes on in detention camps, immigration lockups and police stations.

“Thinking about it makes me really sad. We are also human,” says Zafar, who has been heading the Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM) as its president for some years.

MERHROM advocates for human rights, especially for the Rohingya refugees who are not allowed to work, or much of anything else, in Malaysia even if they hold a UNCHR card.

Zafar said many are forced to do work illicitly to make a living for themselves and their families here. Only kind employers would take these ‘illegals’ as workers and often, they earn a pittance.

“Try to work, just be smart about it,” says Zafar, who is ‘lucky’ to be married to a Malaysian woman and can run a grocery store business registered under her name.

No going back, yet

Others do not have such ‘luxury’. Asked about their hopes and dreams, many Rohingya Astro AWANI spoke to could only make a small attempt to express their wishes while their lives remain in such an uncertain state.

“I can’t be there (back in Myanmar). They will catch and shoot and kill me. My uncle was already shot dead,” says Ibrahim Amer Hamzah, 31, who has already been caught more than 50 times by Malaysian authorities over the past 12 years.

“I just want to work and eat (cari makan) here, I can’t go back,” says Norislam Abu Bashar, 24.

Mohd Yuusof, 40, takes care of seven in the family and does not have a stable job. “It’s hard. How? We can’t work and are only living because of people who are kind and help us.

“Go back? But I don’t have a village anymore. Many have been shot dead, my village was burnt, finished,” says Mohd Yuusof.

Some of the many children who are here as well want to study, but only a handful are being helped by volunteers who set up tuition centres for them.

For Zafar, things are a little easier with the help of his Malaysian wife, but he still hopes for things to be better here and back home.

“If Myanmar achieves democracy tomorrow, tomorrow I go back. Now we are all here in Malaysia, we just want to stay legal,” he says.

To watch more of Astro’s popular programmes and infotainment, use Astro on the Go http://onthego.astro.com.my

Tags: Rohingya, Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM)

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Rohingya in Malaysia: Between a rock and a hard place Read more at: http://english.astroawani.com/news/show/rohingya-in-malaysia-between-a-rock-and-a-hard-place-35991?cp

Rohingya in Malaysia: Between a rock and a hard place

The stateless Rohingya flee their homes to escape ethnic persecution in Myanmar; but reach Malaysia & remain stateless in their new homes.
‘We are already victims. Don’t make us victims twice.’ Such is the simple plea of Zafar Ahmead Mohd Abdul Ghani for the thousands of Rohingya seeking refuge here in Malaysia.

Zafar himself is Rohingya, a Muslim ethnic minority from the Rakhine state in western Myanmar who have been subjected to ethnic and religious persecution in the predominantly Buddhist country for years.

The Rohingya are unrecognised as citizens by their government, and are considered ‘stateless’ immigrants in their own country although they claim to have lived there for centuries.

Many of the dark-skinned people of Bengali descent say that they are not allowed to practice their own culture, religion or even speak their own language. Hundreds have been killed, and their villages burnt allegedly by the military and police.

Such systematic persecution or “ethnic cleansing” as some call it, has led hundreds of thousands to flee their homeland to seek asylum and safety. They leave in dangerous boats – risking drowning on high seas and enduring days of starvation and sickness – with hopes to get to any land that will offer refuge.

Many have ended up in Bangladesh, others in Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, and India. Some even made it as far as Australia.

Being Rohingya in Malaysia

In Malaysia, the Rohingya have been seeking refuge since the 80s, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) stating that there are 36,290 of them here (as of April 2014). There are perhaps a few thousand more unaccounted for.

Astro AWANI recently visited some of them living in the capital, Kuala Lumpur, and found that life as a Rohingya refugee in Malaysia is not at all easy.

“It didn’t matter where (we went then), as long as we lived,” says Zafar, who arrived in Malaysia as ‘boat people’ 22 years ago.

For Zafar and majority of the asylum seekers who made the perilous journey to flee from being killed and tortured in the own country; they only fall victim to human trafficking, migrant exploitation and abuses in another country.

In effect, they are caught between a rock and a hard place: stateless back home and stateless in their new homes.

Living and working in fear

Malaysia is not a signatory to the 1951 UN Refugees Convention. As such, there are no legal mechanisms in place to give any status to refugees. Although the Malaysian government has gradually softened its stance through the years, they are vulnerable to constant harassment and detention.

“I was arrested 14 times (in Malaysia I can tell you exactly what goes on in detention camps, immigration lockups and police stations.

“Thinking about it makes me really sad. We are also human,” says Zafar, who has been heading the Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM) as its president for some years.

MERHROM advocates for human rights, especially for the Rohingya refugees who are not allowed to work, or much of anything else, in Malaysia even if they hold a UNCHR card.

Zafar said many are forced to do work illicitly to make a living for themselves and their families here. Only kind employers would take these ‘illegals’ as workers and often, they earn a pittance.

“Try to work, just be smart about it,” says Zafar, who is ‘lucky’ to be married to a Malaysian woman and can run a grocery store business registered under her name.

No going back, yet

Others do not have such ‘luxury’. Asked about their hopes and dreams, many Rohingya Astro AWANI spoke to could only make a small attempt to express their wishes while their lives remain in such an uncertain state.

“I can’t be there (back in Myanmar). They will catch and shoot and kill me. My uncle was already shot dead,” says Ibrahim Amer Hamzah, 31, who has already been caught more than 50 times by Malaysian authorities over the past 12 years.

“I just want to work and eat (cari makan) here, I can’t go back,” says Norislam Abu Bashar, 24.

Mohd Yuusof, 40, takes care of seven in the family and does not have a stable job. “It’s hard. How? We can’t work and are only living because of people who are kind and help us.

“Go back? But I don’t have a village anymore. Many have been shot dead, my village was burnt, finished,” says Mohd Yuusof.

Some of the many children who are here as well want to study, but only a handful are being helped by volunteers who set up tuition centres for them.

For Zafar, things are a little easier with the help of his Malaysian wife, but he still hopes for things to be better here and back home.

“If Myanmar achieves democracy tomorrow, tomorrow I go back. Now we are all here in Malaysia, we just want to stay legal,” he says.

To watch more of Astro’s popular programmes and infotainment, use Astro on the Go http://onthego.astro.com.my

Tags: Rohingya, Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM)

WORLD REFUGEE DAY 2014 20 JUNE 2014 HOPE FOR THE FUTURE

hear source:

PRESS STATEMENT
22 JUNE 2014

WORLD REFUGEE DAY 2014
20 JUNE 2014
HOPE FOR THE FUTURE

 

World Refugee Day is celebrated every year to commemorate the struggles of refugees who forced to flee their country due to war, conflict and human rights abuses. Every year the numbers of refugees and asylum seekers are increasing. According to the United Nations report, to date more than 50 million people worldwide currently refugees, asylum seekers or internally displaced persons within their own countries. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) facing great challenges to cope with the current situation where the numbers are increasing tremendously for the past few years due to war and conflict in some particular countries.

The world effort to reduct the conflict is very little compared to the huge numbers of refugees and asylum seekers who suffered from endless human rights abuses around the world.

We the minority ethnic Rohingya in Myanmar become the victims of genocide for more than 60 decades. The United Nations has announced the ethnic Rohingya as the most prosecuted ethnic in the world. But what the United Nations and the World Leaders do to stop the genocide? Until now they are not able to stop the genocide. We are dying and living in hardship day by day and waiting when the situation will change.

While the International communities continuously urge the United Nations, Super Power Countries, World Leaders, ASEAN and OIC to intervene with the Myanmar government to stop the genocide against minority Rohingya, non of them can do so.

Why can’t the United Nations and the Super Power Countries stop the war and conflict around the world? The problem is the United Nations and the Super powers do not want to resolve the issue for their own interest. We are very much frustrated to see the United Nations as the most mandated body in the world fail to stop the genocide agaist minority Rohingya in Myanmar. We hope for the Super Power Countries to use their influence to increase pressure to Myanmar government to stop the genocide against stateless Rohingya but our lives does not matter to them.
There is no political will to stop the killing and human rights abuses towards minority Rohingya.

The United Nations and the Super Power Countries must work towards reducing war and conflict around the world rather than looking for more budgets to cope with the increase numbers of refugees.

We regret to see how the ASEAN react to the plights of Rohingya. The ASEAN do not able to face the Myanmar government to stop the Genocide towards ethnic minority. The failure of ASEAN to deal with Myanmar government has serious impact on the ASEAN members. The refugees and the asylum seekers forced to flee Myanmar and seek refuge in neigboring countries especially Bangladesh, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia. Non of these countries have sign the 1951 Refugee Convention. Meaning there is no protection guarantee for the refugees and asylum seekers who seeking refuge in those countries. We are not allow to work, our children could not go to formal school and we have to pay higher fees for the hospitalization and treatment.

We have a big hope for the OIC members to deal with the Myanmar government to stop the genocide but we are still hoping until now. While hoping hundreds or even thousand of us have died in our homeland or in transit countries.

What else can we hope? How long can we hope? So many issues are not resolved.

While we thankful to the Malaysian government for giving us the place to stay temporarily, we still have some major issues that we always bring to the attention of the Malaysian government. That includes the rights to work, rights to formal education, rights to health and others. We are strugling day by day to feed our families. As the Malaysian government did not give us the permission to work, we have to work illegally and we have to face the Malaysian law for working illegaly.

Currently there are huge numbers of Rohingya asylum seekers fail to register themselves at the UNHCR office. We do not understand why the UNHCR take a lengthy time to register ethnic Rohingya. As a result there are huge numbers of Rohingya in police lock-ups, prisons and dentention camps throughout Malaysia. Most of them have major health problem due to their background. The United Nations has already well known the plight of Rohingya in Myanmar especially after the attack on minority Rohingya in June 2012. However the registration process is very slow and this put them at high risk of arrest.

We are frustrated with the slow registration process by the UNHCR office in Kuala Lumpur for the ethnic Rohingya. We put our lives in great danger when we flee our country to seek protection in neigboring countries. When we reached the UNHCR office we face the hardship to register ourselves with them.

We have to wait for many years for the registration process and meanwhile many were arrested by the authorities. As a result thousands of Rohingya currently detain in detention camps. Some Rohingya died in the detention camps and suffered from serious diseases.

Next week the Muslims around the world will be fasting in the month of Ramadhan. Lots of our Mosques and Madrasah has been burnt especially after the conflict in June 2012. Our religious rights has been taken away by the Myanmar government as they closing the Mosques and do not allow us to perform our religious duties.

For the upcoming Holy month of Ramadhan, we are hoping that the UNHCR and Malaysian government could release the Rohingya in detentions so that they also can perform the religious duties in better condition. Back home we do not know how our families can go through the month of Ramadhan as the Myanmar government continuously prosecute us in different ways. We are not allow to perform prayers at Mosqeus what else prayers in the month of Ramadhan. We feel very sad as we could not perform our religious duties in our home land.

While the United Nations and World Leaders highlighting the refugee issues arround the world, the plight of Rohingya refugees are always left behind. We are the forgotton one though the United Nations themselves categories the Rohingya as the most prosecuted ethnic in the world.

We only ask for one thing from the United Nations, Super Power Countries, ASEAN, OIC and International Communities at large. Please STOP the Genocide towards minority Rohingya.

Thank you.
Yours sincerely,

 

Mr. Zafar Ahmad Bin Abdul Ghani
President
Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM)
Tel No: +6016-6827287
Blog: http://www.merhrom.wordpress.com
Email: rights4rohingya@yahoo.co.uk
Email: rights4rohingyas@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/zafar.ahmad.

https://twitter.com/merhromZafar

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